Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    I had the opportunity to check out four TBH's today. In one of the discussions the question of regression from continually culling and harvesting comb came up. I would like to know if those with TBH's have seen a constant regression to smaller and smaller cell size over time as comb is harvested and replaced by the bees?

    Would TBH raised bees be better candidates for placement on smallcell foundation at some point, versus just regressing normal bees?
    This would possibly cut down on small cell regression comb mess ups.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,142

    Post

    >I would like to know if those with TBH's have seen a constant regression to smaller and smaller cell size over time as comb is harvested and replaced by the bees?

    Yes, I have.

    >Would TBH raised bees be better candidates for placement on smallcell foundation at some point, versus just regressing normal bees?

    Of course. They will already be at least the first regression even if you haven't swapped any comb.

    >This would possibly cut down on small cell regression comb mess ups.

    Definitely.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boonsboro, MD, USA
    Posts
    67

    Post

    BjornBee, I hope you enjoyed the look at the hives. It was nice to see a beekeeper in person who didn't think I was just plain crazy for "wasting my time on those silly top bar hives". When I first decided to build some (and before I found this site) everybody I talked to told me that "without foundation bees will only draw drone comb, or that I couldn't havest honey every year because I would destroy all the comb and the bees would take forever to rebuild it, or that the comb would all be attached all over the place and I wouldn't be able to inspect or work the hive,no equipment available, ...". It was nice to find this site and the people here with open minds willing to try something a little different, and willing to help others wanting to try.
    I think that TBHs are great for small hobby beekeepers, they are very simple, easy to work, and cheap (unless you want to buy one made from furniture grade hardwood ).
    They regress themselves naturally, giving a head start to people wanting to try small cell bees in traditional equipment, and most important to me at least
    they are fun to work, watch, and build.

    I shouldn't forget the beautiful fresh clean comb honey either. You can go pull one almost any time you want.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    You can go pull one almost any time you want.
    and nothing tastes better, as long as you don't get any bees in the bite!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    limulus, I had a geat time. I learned alot. Nothing boosts the old confidence level more than actually seeing something instead of looking at pictures.

    Thank you for the offer and hospitality.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boonsboro, MD, USA
    Posts
    67

    Post

    BjornBee, It was great having you, It was the first time I had ever gone into the hives with someone over the age of four, who was interested in TBHs and had something to offer other than "I think that comb is crooked, you should cut it out and I will hold it for you [img]smile.gif[/img] " or "catch that drone and give it to me".
    Thanks for the feeding tips and your other advice as well.
    GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR TBH

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads