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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
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    2,598

    Post

    Amazing - I thought the TBH was supposed to be an inexpensive alternative to langs and such. Not necessarily so:

    http://www.backyardhive.com/

    It sure looks nicely put together and appears to be quality workmanship, but wow, the price. Anyone got one of these?

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    723

    Post

    I find the most interesting claims are that: 1. It has no movable parts so it won't wear out. (I'm not sure why the frames/bars and top count as movable in a langstroth, but not in this TBH)
    and 2: "Because the Backyard Hive is designed for bee health, pesticides and medicines are not required" Is this the cure for all bee diseases/pests? I suppose if you never inspect them except though the glass (as the ad says) then you'd never really know (until they're dead).

    Of course he does give a 12 months guarantee. If they did die out in the year I guess you could return it, no questions asked. I don't think you'll get that from any other vender [img]smile.gif[/img]

    -Tim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    945

    Post

    It looks like for $295 you get an exquisite piece of hardwood furniture and a video -- but wait -- that's not all. You also get an exclusive membership to the club.

    It's a bit too Ron Popeil-ish for me.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

    Post

    I get a kick out of the recorded interview with the "creator" of this wunderproduct. From the website: "I recently had the opportunity to interview Corwin Bell, founder of BackYardHive.com about how he got started in beekeeping and what he has learned along the way. . . . Fortunately, I recorded our interview and got Corwin's permission to share it with you." I am sure there was a lot or arm twisting . . . . "

    Someone is clearly using marketing techniques he learned from late night infomecials.

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Big Grin

    But wait, there's more! If you order now, you will get a free lifetime membership in the Beekeepers' Club!

    What a hoot!



    I can't wait to see the infomercial on late night TV!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    Hey, this guy is laughing all the way to the bank.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,381

    Post

    Half of my ancestors were German and the other half Bohemian, hey, maybe I can start raking in the $$. I wonder if anyone has actually purchased one of these $300 (sales price) empty TBH's?
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Actually with the materials he uses and the craftsmanship that these appear to have been built with, they probably are worth the $300. If I were only ever needing 1-5 hives, or wanted display hives, sure I would buy them. They are like furniture by appearance.

    Funny thing is except for a few minor differences, his design is exactly like mine, just with softened corners [img]smile.gif[/img] A lot of the things he writes about his TBHs are almost quotes from my own TBH sites.

    I am considering selling my TBHs also as some added income while I ramp up my livestock, and I was going to sell them for $200. Cost in materials for me is about $60 for select pine and marine grade plywood for covers, plus about 3 hours of labor for tossed together OR 6 hours of labor for taking care and doing a few things nicer, so $300 for what he's making really isn't bad. He puts a lot of time into it, and using hardwoods to boot is a lot more expensive.

    I don't think he's banking UNLESS he has set up a deal with a sawmill for volume cuts, and a woodshop for volume carpentry, in which case he might be make $10 extra dollars per hive than doing it himself one hive at a time.

    Like I said I can production line construct my hive in 3 hours of labor, one at a time is longer.

    My hives on the other hand have legs on them do you don't have to bend over.

    [size="1"][ October 05, 2005, 08:48 PM: Message edited by: Scot Mc Pherson ][/size]
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Alpine, TX
    Posts
    104

    Post

    It is a shame that he makes it out to be so "idiot proof" and some people will obviously have difficulties - hopefully they will start doing some research and not get into too much trouble- Heck, I've done a lot of reading and still have challenges (mostly AHB requeening impossibilities
    It is beautifully made but frankly, my bees don't seem to care one whit how their house looks as long as it's clean and shaped comfortably for their needs.... our hives are made w/ scrap lumber pieced together and painted w/ foundling paint but I'm not in the biz either.
    Ah well, the beat goes on.........
    I smile like this because I have no idea what I\'m doing :-)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Wink

    Ya still gotta get the bees another $65-85.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

    Post

    Scott - I do not deny that this product looks to be superb and it might be worht the 300, but I guess my mindset re: TBHs is that they are more of an inexpensive low tech mode. There is always an upper end to any technology. Heck somewhere in the net there is a $1500 oak lang with a peaked roof.

    Keith

    [size="1"][ October 11, 2005, 08:57 PM: Message edited by: kgbenson ][/size]
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    North Texas, USA
    Posts
    61

    Post

    How about cedar? Looks expensive.

    http://www.beekeeping.co.uk/products.htm
    “It is only as the intelligence of man moves along harmoniously with<br />the laws of Nature, that any improvement can be expected.”<br /><br />G. M. Doolittle

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hirschbach, Bavaria, Germany
    Posts
    643

    Post

    I got an awsome bridge for sale, buy now and I'll throw in life time maintenance for free.
    Procrastination is the assassination of inspiration.
    www.customwoodkitsinternational.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Louisville, CO
    Posts
    2

    Post

    I have a BackYardHive, but I got it too late to get it started this year. I have to wait until spring :-( I hope to catch a feral swarm to start it.

    Actually, I'm a partner in the business that sells these hives.

    I appreciate everyone's comments. As some speculated (thanks Scot), with materials and workmanship, there really isn't all that much profit in our hives right now. With more volume, we my actually be able to get the price down to a point where we break even. We certainly aren't out to scalp anyone.

    If you have ever tried to start a company from scratch, you know that there are lots of costs beyond just material and workmanship.

    These are made by hand in small quantities in a cabinet makers workshop. The quality and attention to detail is definitely there. But, we agree, the price is too much for many people. Those are the people who should just simply make their own.

    We will soon offer the plans on our website to allow anyone to build these hives on their own. In addition, we will offer just the top bars (which are the key to the design) so that people can make their own box, but still have milled hardwood top bars.

    We feel the hardwood is critical for long-term durability, and that having the top bars milled provides a perfectly straight and consistent place for the bees to draw out comb -- helping with alignment.

    I have to confess, I'm the marketing hack that put up the original site. I spend most of my time writing marketing pitches to small business owners and independent entrepreneurs. I shoulda known that what appeals to them, would sound goofy to people with a less commercial interest. Have since rebuilt the site to more closely fit our goals and to communicate who we are.

    We truly want to further the cause of TBH and to improve the general state of the bee population. Yes, this is a business venture, but so far we have far from profitable. Not unusual for a new venture, we'll get there.

    I personally believe that if you are going to try to spread an idea, you had better have deep pockets or some way for the idea to fund itself. We don't have the former, so the latter is our path. I see no reason to begrudge anyone a fair profit.

    Our new website is being built as an information portal for newbies to get exposed to hobby beekeeping, to learn more, and to get their questions answered. It will take some time to build, but it's a start.

    I'm looking forward to getting to know more about TBHs through this forum. As I mentioned, I'm the marketing hack, NOT a beekeeping expert, that is my partner's role. He didn't like my copywriting either.

    Thanks,

    Doug

    [size="1"][ December 09, 2005, 12:28 AM: Message edited by: Hudie ][/size]
    <a href=\"http://www.BackYardHive.com\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.BackYardHive.com</a>

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
    Posts
    203

    Post

    Doug,
    Thanks for updating us on your buisness. It allways helps to have a little more info. I wish you success with the buisness.
    Kieran
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    I've tried making a few things that aren't available from normal sources and when you don't get some huge volume (read truckload) discount on the materials and have a lot of cheap labor available, and big discounts on shipping, it's very hard to compete with the "big boys".
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Louisville, CO
    Posts
    2

    Post

    Thanks Michael and Murphy. I appreciate your comments.

    Michael, I checked out your website and the information you provide about cell size is amazing.

    I created a post on our website about it:
    http://backyardhive.com/content/view/28/1/

    Thanks for providing this excellent information!

    Doug
    <a href=\"http://www.BackYardHive.com\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.BackYardHive.com</a>

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    &gt;Thanks for providing this excellent information!

    You are welcome.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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