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Thread: hive pics

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    Hello All

    this is a work in progress but I thought I had it to a point to post some pics and see if anybody had any comments

    http://www.drobbins.net/bee's/lh/lh.html

    Dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    231

    Post

    Looks good.
    I hope to construct something along similar lines this winter, to put to use next year.
    -Robert<br /><a href=\"http://photos.bobsbees.com\" target=\"_blank\">Photos and Such</a>

  3. #3

    Post

    Hi Dave. Small world. Working on same but mounting 3/4" EMT conduit for legs directly to box via 2 home clamps so each can be adjusted for terrain. As well as a frame rest hooks.

    Bob

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    Bob,

    what is EMT?
    I'm still up in the air on stands
    I'm debating how high to place them
    a topbar hive I think you would want waist hight
    but if you're gonna super it, maybe a bit lower
    I'm wingin it here, ideas welcome

    Dave

  5. #5

    Post

    Dave
    EMT is the metal conduit Electicians use. It also goes by the term "thin wall" as it is not as thick as "rigid". You also may want to get 1/2" "push penny" plugs as they can be tweaked to cap the ends of the 3/4" conduit to prevent water from filling. You can find them at lowes or home depot but I believe they go by the name plug caps as thier true purpose is to plug the hole of an electrical outlet box if you mistakenly nock out the wrong hole. Be shure and use the metal as the plasted plugs can't be tweaked.
    If you go to electical distributer (ie Graybar) and ask for a "push penny" they'll know what you mean. I also use a thru bolt to fasten two clamps to each leg and as a extra measure Slide a hose clamp up agains the bottom of box and tighten just to be shure legs don't slide. I have tested on a 4 leg stand and have supported 400lbs whithout slipping however I use 6 legs since box is so long and there are times most of the weight well be on one end. I only make the legs 17" long so the center of gravity remains low but still out of skunks reach. By using the conduit it allows me to grease them to stop the ants. The one I'm working on now is going to have a sliding bottom so for checking/tearing down swarm cells I'll just use an inspection mirror with a metal hook so I will not have to open up the box to inspect.

    Bob

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,127

    Post

    IMO it's simpler, blows over less, and takes less material to put a stool, bench, toolbox, hive box on it's side etc. down and sit on it and put it the right height from there. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Wink

    Good pictures, giving me ideas, hummmmmmmmmmmm, Honey, I need to go to the lumber yard, can I have the check book, PLEASE.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    here's a few more pic's

    http://www.drobbins.net/bee's/lh/lh.html

    now I gotta get out the posthole digger and set the stands before the ground freezes

    Dave

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