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Thread: Ventilation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Denton, N.C.
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    In the pictures I've see of tbh's, it looks like all the topbars are pushed together. Can you explain to me how the hive is ventilated when it get to 85 to 95 degrees.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,751

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    Bees fanning their wings like crazy. [img]smile.gif[/img] The combs are the same way in a tree. All solidly attached to the top with no space above them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Denton, N.C.
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    Thanks Michael, I had read if it got to hot inside the hive, the comb would turn loose.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Sometimes it does. But sometimes more ventilation can help with this and sometimes it's the CAUSE. The bees are trying to maintain a temperature around 92 F. When it's 105 F outside bringing in MORE air may not be the soultion. Evaporative cooling is what the bees do to cool it and that requires careful, controled ventilation to get that temperature. The bees do it all the time in natural hives with very small openings.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Rockville, In
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    256

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    Now Michael, if you were to super above the TBH, as you do, where is the bee space for them to get to the honey super? Do you use a modified top bar in that situation? And would this create a ventilation problem in the TBH?

    Thanks,

    Steve
    Steve<br /><br /><a href=\"http://www.cozynestfarm.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.cozynestfarm.com</a><br /><br />All that\'s golden must be honey

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
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    1,487

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    crazy
    you can leave a space between top bars to access a super. I have not tried it.

    As for your ventilation question, it is surprising but there doesn't seem to be a big problem with the ventilation in a TBH. If it gets real hot you can prop open the top and that seems to do the trick.

    Or if you still had trouble you could drill some holes. Like Michael said, the bees can usually accomodate.

    [size="1"][ October 14, 2005, 09:45 AM: Message edited by: BerkeyDavid ][/size]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    &gt;if you were to super above the TBH, as you do, where is the bee space for them to get to the honey super?

    My top bar hives have no entrance per se. The first bar is back 3/8" of an inch from the front and the front cover (I have three migratory covers for the cover) is propped up 1/4" to make the entrance. Since they already come in the gap at the top and the gap at the front when I add the super I just put that super on and the migratory cover on top of that with the gap at the front still. Now the bees come in the gap between the lid and the super (6 5/8" higher than before) and down through the gap at the front of the bars (same as before).

    &gt;Do you use a modified top bar in that situation?

    No, I don't.

    &gt;And would this create a ventilation problem in the TBH?

    It does not seem to make any difference. Three of mine like this have a screened bottom board. The KTBH has a solid bottom and one of the TTBHs has a solid bottom. I haven't notices a lot of difference.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Have a 3 inch wide fixed screened bottom on a KTB, should I seal it for the winter?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    &gt;should I seal it for the winter?

    I would. A piece of cardbboard will do.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    13

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    Thank You Will Do

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