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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ypsilanti, Michigan
    Posts
    38

    Post

    I'm in Michigan with 2 regular hives, but am really interested in making a TBH.

    I have an extra five frame nuc (deep) with a queen, and was wondering if it is too late in the year to build a TBH, shake in the nuc, and let it build up for winter. Could it get strong enough in time for the cold?

    I could feed, and obviously wouldn't take any honey off of it.

    If not, I can wait until spring, but would love to get a head start.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,102

    Post

    They might, but you're pushing your luck in August. And if it doesn't build up, what would you combine it with to get through the winter? A split right now would be iffy. A shaken swarm would be more iffy and you have no backup (combining) if they don't build up enough.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hookstown PA USA
    Posts
    581

    Post

    I don't think I would try it either. Better to wait until spring.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ypsilanti, Michigan
    Posts
    38

    Post

    Thanks for the opinions. I'll just work on getting my nuc stronger and if it makes it through the winter, I'll shake it into the TBH come spring. Should be fun!

    Misty

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Post

    if you have extra lang equipment you could transfer the nuke to a deep and fill out the space with five 19 inch top bars. if you don't have the extra deep you could build a deep long hive, transfer the five frames and fill the space with top bars. this way you are able to transfer everything back and forth and still have the fun of building your own equipment.
    all that is gold does not glitter

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    I think it's too late for michigan. I do think you should transfer the nuc to a deep at least and get to feeding them, they'll have a better chance of overwintering in a full hive.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hookstown PA USA
    Posts
    581

    Post

    I think feeding them is the best advise. And feed heavy too. I'd put them in a lang and leave feed on them all winter long. I don't know your weather but I think it is much more harsh then here in PA and nucs can have problems getting through winter here.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    A french guy living in Chester, UK
    Posts
    133

    Post

    How can you feed your bees in a tbh as if i am right, there is no hole in the top part of the hive to put a feeder?

    is an entrance feeder ok?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Puget Sound
    Posts
    65

    Post

    A couple of possibilities that I can think of.

    1. Make a hole in a topbar that the bees could use to get up to the feeder.

    2. Make an internal feeder the shape of your tbh and keep it full.

    I use a variation of the first one with a mason jar lid attached to the bar which I screw a full jar of sugar water to with small holes in the lid. The bees have no trouble emptying it, though I place a plastic lid under it to keep the drips controlled.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    I use ziplock bags. Fill them up, put them in, then cut three 3 inch holes with a razor blade.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Post

    my latest technique has been plastic soda bottles. i use a needle held by a pair of pliers to put holes around the bottom of bottles short enough to stand up in the hive and holes along the side if they are to lay down.
    all that is gold does not glitter

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    49

    Post

    I have used entrance feeders to build up a late small swarm during the drought several summers ago. Worked fine. Ideally I like the bees to build up on their own, but even the strong hives were struggling some that summer.

    Tom Patterson,
    Aurora, CO
    Tom Patterson<br />Aurora, CO

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hirschbach, Bavaria, Germany
    Posts
    643

    Post

    Hello all,
    IMO keep them in the TBH they have the best chance in as close to a natural environment as they can get. Then the best thing you can do to feed is what Oldgreyone said build an internal feeder and keep it full, I would add two notes to this; 1st it does not have to be the same shape as the hive I use a plastic soda bottle with a hole very low set on a plastic plate as the hole is exposed it fills the plate untill the hole is covered real simple and it works! Use whatever works in your TBH. 2nd pull the feeder before they cluster for the winter and put fondant ALOT in the bottom, don't worry about moisture they will have enough. This will allow them to feed when temps in the hive allow them to break cluster, even if you don't see them flying. I did this last year with one of mine and they made it through a German winter with flying colors. Granted this is just one example but when I first saw them flying I ran out and opened the hive and they were still feeding on the fondant all but a silver dollar size chnk was gone. My 2 cents for what its worth. GOOD LUCK
    Procrastination is the assassination of inspiration.
    www.customwoodkitsinternational.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Alpine, TX
    Posts
    104

    Post

    Hi MIKI,
    How do you make your fondant?
    Thanks,
    AJ
    I smile like this because I have no idea what I\'m doing :-)

  15. #15

    Post

    For feeding of my tbh I have used simply a glass jar and a small plate .Fill the jarr with sugar water and put the plate on it.Then,simply turn the jarr with the plate upsie down and you have a feeder.
    Sasha
    "Do nothing. Time is too precious to waste." Buddha

  16. #16

    Post

    Question for Miki-
    Would not the fondant get dirty if you put it below the bars?

    Sasha
    "Do nothing. Time is too precious to waste." Buddha

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,102

    Post

    The bees can actually filter pollen out of nectar. They can clean up things that are dirty quite well.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hirschbach, Bavaria, Germany
    Posts
    643

    Post

    I buy my fondant ready made from a feed store and like Mike said they do a good job of keeping their environment clean. The jar method is great for starting but as you grow you will see a need to deliver a larger quantity of syrup faster. ,on this point I also agree with Mike on open feeding its working great for me.

    Shsha, How does the syrup get out seems to me this creats a vacume?
    Procrastination is the assassination of inspiration.
    www.customwoodkitsinternational.com

  19. #19
    canoesailor Guest

    Post

    Would they build up some and winter better in a 5 frame nuc with no room to expand, or in a TBH or full 10 frame super. I'm far South of Mich., but I'd shake them myself, or put 'em in a bigger box. Then again, I've had a good queen winter in just one Dadant size and come roaring out in the Spring to fill SIX (6 5/8) supers with honey. That's over 200 pounds. The right queen and timely supering up seemed paramount.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,102

    Post

    For a large cluster space isn't so much an issue, but for a small cluster it's a world of diffrenece if the size of the area is appropriate to the size of the cluster.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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