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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Puget Sound
    Posts
    65

    Question

    Today I went with my son and daughter to watch splits being made from standard hives. This was put on by our local bee keeping association.

    They would start with a strong hive and find 3 or 4 frames with no or very little sealed brood but lots of eggs or open brood from the brood box. Each frame was shaken or brushed clean of bees, mostly to keep from having the queen on board. They would place these in a box which was placed above the hive with a queen excluder. The idea being that the nurse bees would rush up to take care of the brood. This box than would after 24 hours be taken to another location and then given a queen the following day.

    I was wondering if this could be used in a TBH using the honey barrier as a queen exluder? It seems like an ideal way to get a good start for a hive without worrying about finding the queen on each topbars comb.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    This is how I like to do topbarhive splits. Its a pretty good ensurance that the hives are split in a balanced method. I don't liek to take all eggs and give to split, I like to have bees emerging in all stages for both hives to ensure donor hive isn't completely robbed of a workforce and the new split is constantly getting refreshed with new young bees and only has a few weeks of lag instead of a few months and then a population explosion. Its better to have bees of all ages in a hive. Bees of different ages do their jobs better. When bees are forced to do things early or do young jobs when old, they don't do it as well. They do it fine, but not as well.


    http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org/...e=TopBarSplits
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    I guess I don't understand why you even care where the queen lays. If it's brood, leave it in the hive. If it's honey and you think they can spare it, take it. If the queen needs somewhere to lay, then I hope she finds it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Puget Sound
    Posts
    65

    Post

    Michael; I think the idea is to make a split without having to make a search for the queen.

    Scot: your point on the advantages of having bees of all ages in the hive is a major one and deserves consideration in any split.

    Thanks for the input.

    Johnny 5

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    &gt;Michael; I think the idea is to make a split without having to make a search for the queen.

    Unless you're making a walk away split (letting them raise their own queen) then you always care where the queen is. Both halves of the split need brood, honey, pollen etc. and if you're adding a queen you need to know which half to add it to.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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