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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hirschbach, Bavaria, Germany
    Posts
    643

    Post

    I think Scott was taken out of context and he is right when he says its nothing to be scared of, its not. You have a problem and it can be corrected. Scott and I sit on oppisite sides of the fence when it comes to brood nest management. He likes to micro manage and I like to wait to see what the bees will do on thier own. If I choose to micro manage I would take his advice.
    Procrastination is the assassination of inspiration.
    www.customwoodkitsinternational.com

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    I was beeing facetious. I guess it wasn't seen that way. Oh well.....

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Miki,
    I don't think I could be classified as a micro manager, it had been almost a month and a half before I got into my hives this week. When installing a new pacakge into a TBH, you really need to be guiding the bees to build straight comb, because the bees and you have different points of view on what is orderly. Bees will diverge further and further from what you expect (and desire usually) in nest building. I let them manage their own nest, but when it comes to building comb, I still want it as straight and small cell as possible. Its a matter of being able to get into the hives and inspect them properly. If you go ahead and let them mess things up in the beginning and fix it later, you are causing more harm than you think. If you fix it very early before they really have any significant brooding, you cause the bees maybe a couple of weeks setback. Wait until later and you can cause them a whole season's worth of setback leaving you with bees that can barely make it through winter because they couldn't build up well enough.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hirschbach, Bavaria, Germany
    Posts
    643

    Post

    Like I said we sit on different sides of the fence and I have heard the arguments before. It was mans intervention that messed them up in the first place. Once we accept the fact that we will never control mother nature maybe we will stop messing up our planet so there will be something left for future generations. I am the type that learns from past mistakes, so we will have to just agree to disagree. The comb in my hives is not perfect (in a humanÂ’s opinion) but I can inspect it and the bees work with it. I call that a good compromise.
    Procrastination is the assassination of inspiration.
    www.customwoodkitsinternational.com

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Miki,
    We probably have a lot more in common than you think. I am a strict organic beekeeper, I don't interfere with the bees at all, except I do understand the necessity to make inspections slightly less arduous than working a feral hive. I keep broodnest in order, don't move things all around I don't make the bees do things at inappropriate times, in fact I don't make them do anything at all except two things. I want them to live in my boxes (since I am a beekeeper), and I'd like them to build stright comb. That means comb that doesn't span across more than one bar, and comb that I don't need to perform surgery just to inspect through the whole hive.

    I left the bees alone to do there own thing the first time I installed them in TBHs. I waited FAR too long before I intervened and those bees suffered because at least here where I live, it is required that the hives be inspected by an official inspector. To keep these bees legal, I had to do surgery. Unfortunately I did it too late and the damage was worse because of all the work that needed to be done.

    Just like you I learned from my mistakes. I don't new installations make such a mess anymore. I help them keep things striaght. Once they are straight they generally stay very straight.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

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