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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,486

    Cool

    At the end of my first year of beekeeping I thought it appropriate to think about what I have learned from by Top Bar Hives.

    I think the biggest thing I have learned is an appreciation for those beekeepers, dreamers and experimenters who have gone before us.

    It is truly amazing to me how many times I come back to the conclusion that the basic Langstroth hive solves the problem I am dealing with. I am not considering abandoning my TBH's or recommending that others do the same. Rather I suggest that our experimentations give us a greater comprehension of our guest, the honey bee, and the work and thought which others have contributed to make beekeeping a successful endeavor.

    So I propose a toast (of tea with honey) to those dreamers, experimenters, and doers who have gone before us and upon whose shoulders we stand!

    Cheers to all and best wishes for a happy and sweet new year!

    david

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    942

    Post

    Speaking of Rev. Langstroth, not only were his ideas revolutionary for the time, but in my opinion, he was an excellent writer as well. I'm about half way through his book. While all the current beekeeping books read like text books, his is never dry and a true pleasure to read.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,324

    Post

    A lot of the old beekeeping books are in more of a narrative style than a "textbook" style. I find it refreshing also. Plus it's sometimes very enlightening to follow their thought processes to the conclusions they came to.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    I haven't really done the research on the history of beekeeping equipment, but I have read some history. And I would have to say that I agree, David. Before, I had gotten the idea that I would go TBH only. Then as I came here and other sites and read of all the tweaking that some were doing to get things going smoothly, I became convinced that the only pro I wasn't able to meet with a Langstroth was the cost. But time being $$, I decided that Langstroth would be just fine with me. I think that, if I had the patience and experience of others, I could eventually get a TBH going. I still have hopes of eliminating that initial set-up cost that comes with Lang. hives. Which is why I return to this page so often. Until then, I'll have to stick with the old reliable.
    WayaCoyote
    WayaCoyote

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Guys,

    I've ordered the fascimile of Langstroths book. I really enjoy reading the historical books and empathizing, somewhat, in their experience. It's also amazing just how much more we know than our grandfathers did, about bee biology. Yet the escence of that experience has remained about the same.

    Regards
    Dennis

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,324

    Post

    I have both the reprint (you can get from Amazon.com) and an 1860 version.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    You can download free copies from the US Patent Office at http://www.uspto.gov/

    You'll have to have the software to read a TIFF file. I downloaded them, printed them and then rescanned them as a couple of the original are crooked. I saw copies for sale on ebay, but that's another story. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    438

    Post

    Someone gave me the reprint of the Langstroth book for Christmas. Thanks for the reviews. I can't wait to read it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,324

    Post

    I tred to find the original patent at the US Patent office site and never could find any patents that old available. I ended up buying reprints of the patents. I had the patent number and everything and never found it.

    How did you get access to it?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    24

    Post

    The Mann Library at Cornell has a great collection of old beekeeping books for view. I was only able to download one page at a time which is a real disadvantage but their collection is really worth checking out: http://bees.library.cornell.edu/

    Alethea

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Winterset IA
    Posts
    47

    Post

    I also enjoy the Cornell library. After stumbling around a bit I could download the entire book at once. Only problem is most fractions didnÂ’t OCR correctly so you have to go back to the original scan if you want the correct number.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    Step 1: go to http://www.uspto.gov/
    Step 2: Left side of page, click on search.
    Step 3: Left side of page, click on Patent Number Search
    Step 4: Query = 9300
    Step 5: Click on "Images" at the top of page.
    Step 6: Save page.

    Left side has a page area - step through each of the ten pages, saving as you go.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi David,

    Congrats on your first year of beekeeping. My first trip to a beeyard was with a large commercial beekeeper. When we arrived at the yard, he took a large rope, tied it around my waist and tied the other end to the bee truck. Then he went about working the hives. After awhile I got the courage to ask him about the rope. He said that he often looses his help when they work their first yard and he didn't want me running off. :&gt

    He didn't know it, but I would have worked for free! But that's another story.

    Congrats again.

    Regards
    Dennis

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,324

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,369

    Post

    <<He didn't know it, but I would have worked for free! But that's another story.>>

    Heh heh, I almost ended up working for next to nothing for a neighboring farmer, till he found out I was sweet on his daughter! Considering what he was offering in wages, I guess he really didn't have much use for me before that either

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Guys,

    I am reading through my copy of 'The Hive and the Honey bee' by Rev. Langstroth. It's a great read and I agree with BerkeyDavid that he achieved his objectives with his hive design.

    In his day, beekeeping was being advanced by the observations and practices of the 'common' man. Science has filled in some of the details, but I think it's still the common man who advances beekeeping today.

    Regards
    Dennis
    Thinking that most scientific effort is applied where the most of the money is spent, like blasting holes in comets or something :&gt

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