Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 24 of 24
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boynton Beach, Florida, USA
    Posts
    278

    Post

    Hi Nathaniel,

    I just melt some beeswax in a pan. Put a top bar on a tray to contain any spilled wax. And use a spoon to pour it into the groove. I'm not too careful about it.

    After it solidifies, I take a hive tool and scrap any excess wax off the top bar leaving the kerf filled with beeswax that is flush with the top bar surface.

    Regards
    Dennis

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boynton Beach, Florida, USA
    Posts
    278

    Post

    Hi Michael,

    >Not only will there be a lot of bridge comb on a comb that size, but there is no beekeeper pulling it out and looking at it, moving it around and putting it back.

    Joe Waggles feral hive shows extensive slabs of comb. While the comb is almost completely attached to the sides, almost no burr or brace comb exists between the slabs.

    I think you are completely right about the pulling, looking, moving and putting. When the bees start to firmly attach the comb to the sidewalls, that's probably a good indication that the combs need as much strength as possible. And it's time to leave the combs alone unless the comb is being harvasted. My approach to the comb collapse problem will be this change in management.

    And it's not an easy one for me as I have been a comb puller, looker, mover and puther. But my tbhs have convinced me that less is better. :> )

    Regards
    Dennis

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Dennis,
    I don't know. Joe waggle's feral hive has been my desktop for several months and so I am very familair with it. I can see several locations where the comb is bridged and several places where the bridge has been torn off by the removal of the wall both in the honey stores and the brood nest.

  4. #24

    Post

    Dennis
    I want to thank you very much for the tip about the spoon. It really hit the spot .

    I think that I did a miserable job of trying to explain what I was trying to get across. I was trying to say that the bees in the wild can build reasonably sized comb (with no bur, no side attachment, no end attachment and did not collapse, we should be able to do the same thing. the wide cone that I was speaking of had side attachments on it but the long cone was about two foot wide with no attachments except at the top.I think it was built over several years time).
    I believe that after seeing what happened when I closed the ventilation, that one of the key factors is ventilation. the other hive is looking good and if they rebuild this hive and it last through next year with no collapse, I will continue building this size hive. I think it is the optimal size and with proper ventilation, will work. You must take into account that I am inexperienced and know nothing about bees, but I do know that I like these two hives.

    ------------------
    Old, forgetful and a slow learner

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads