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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Salem, NY
    Posts
    329

    Post

    how do you feed terramycin in a top-bar hive? the instructions say to sprinkle the powder on the inner cover of a langstroth hive, but alas, no inner cover on a tbh!

    also, i assume i will not have to medicate package bees this spring. is this correct?

    thanks for any help y'all can give me,

    justgojumpit

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    >how do you feed terramycin in a top-bar hive?

    I haven't used Terramycin for 28 years and don't intend to feed it. But IF you use terramycin as a preventative (which I don't recommend) I would make an extender pattie with it and put it in the hive.

    >i assume i will not have to medicate package bees this spring. is this correct?

    You don'te EVER have to medicate your bees. The main thing I would monitor for is Varroa mites. If you have them, you'll have to choose from among the many choices. My last choice would be Checkmite and my next to the last would be Apistan.

    You will end up with natural sized cells which will help. You can fog with FGMO if you have a problem (which you may not) you can use oxalic acid, thymol... lots of choices that are not so toxic.

    >thanks for any help y'all can give me,

    You're welcome


    [This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited April 16, 2004).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Salem, NY
    Posts
    329

    Post

    Thanks Mike,

    so what i understand is that terramycin is really not necessary. how about fumadil B and pollen substitute? i will use the apistan strips in the fall, i believe, after the last nectar flow.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    >so what i understand is that terramycin is really not necessary.

    Some people believe it is. I do not.

    >how about fumadil B

    I have never used it. Again, some people think it's absolutely necessary. I do not.

    >and pollen substitute?

    If I use any pollen substitute I mix it with real pollen and there's no point doing it once the tree pollen comes in in late March (around here).

    >i will use the apistan strips in the fall

    Why? Do you have a lot of mites? Have you measured the mites? Are you doing a drop test of some kind? Are you doing a sugar roll? If you don't have a mite problem then you're just adding to your own problems with the Apistan. I have an apiary that was just certified by the State Dept. of Agriculture with NO mites and I haven't used Apistan (Or Checkmite) on these bees at all and have not used it on ANY bees since two years ago. Then I used it because I had a high mite count and the Apistan didn't work anyway.

    > i believe, after the last nectar flow.

    If you are going to use any chemicals (and I would urge you not to) how will you keep track of where they might be chemcials and where there are not in a Top Bar Hive?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Salem, NY
    Posts
    329

    Post

    you pose a strong argument. perhaps i would be better off using medications only if a problem arises, and not as a preventative measure. thanks for the advice. how, though, would you go about feeding pollen to the bees? pollen pattie on the bottom board?

    thanks,
    justgojumpit

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Right now, you don't need to feed pollen. The bees will find some within a day or two. Next year? The bees should have somem saved, and be able to find some early enough that you won't need pollen patties. The only reason why you would need them is far too much rain for the bees to get out, or a draught that has decimated all flora in the area to minimal survival levels. I wouldn't worry about it for now. If you do worry about it, then save yourself some combs witha high %age of pollen stores and put it in the freezer.

    ------------------
    Scot Mc Pherson
    "Linux is a Journey, not a Guided Tour" ~ Me
    "Do or not do, there is no try" ~ Master Yoda
    BeeSourceFAQ: http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/beewiki/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    Some years I haven't fed pollen at all, but my most sucessful method has been some dry (real) pollen and possibly some pollen substitute mixed in (if I can't afford or don't have enough real pollen) in a nuc box a hundred yards or so from the hives. The bees tear it up. I've put patties in many times and even when it was REAL pollen they ignored it. They nibbled on the Bee pro patties a bit (better than usual) but still didn't really take to them like the dry stuff. So I feed pollen away from the hives anyway. As soon as the tree pollen came in they ignored it. If the bees aren't taking it, it's because they don't need it anymore.

    I woulnd't waste my time or money on patties.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    First of all I do not use meds as preventatives. I mixed TM in water for years for chickens. If I had to treat a colony I think I would feed it to them in a syrup. This is what I did last spring as I was directed to do by other beekeepers before I found this list and a organic type minded beekeeper near me. So IF a TBH needed TM you can mix 1/4 teaspoon to a gallon of syrup( probly could mix it stronger but this is what chickens get).

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