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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    Here's a question for you. I have an old candy recipe that calls for adding paraffin to chocolate chips to make a coating for dipping candies. (the paraffin helps keep it from melting I guess) Any reason why I couldn't substitute my cleanest beeswax?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    Chocolate candles? I can't think of any reason it wouldn't work as well as parafin.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    Wouldn't the chocolate lower the melting point too much? Generally parafin is added to chocolate to raise the melting point. "Tropical" chocolate has enough that it won't melt at 104 degrees F or so. Which means it also won't melt in your mouth, but still it would melt too easily in a candle wouldn't it?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Lightbulb

    Mike,
    She's making candies, not candles.

    Bill

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    Sorry, I misread. I don't know how it would taste, but I think nice white beeswax would taste ok.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Well I am a chef by trade. I have used both beeswax and parifin wax in chocolate. Yes the wax helps to keep it from melting but also gives it a nice shiny coat too. I usually tip several hundred long stem strawberries for mothersday in the restaurant or we use edible flowers. We mix it up every few years for variety.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    Thank You Clayton. Would the proportions be the same? (paraffin/chocolate vs. beeswax/chocolate) The recipe I use is rather vague(as are most heirloom recipes)does the beeswax work the same or are there differences.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Coyote,
    Behave,

    Dickm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Chellesbees,

    50/ 50 is too much. It will taste too much like wax. I usually eyeball the amount of wax. Try only 25% wax maybe a little less. You want the chocolat to have a glossy silk look but don't want the people eating it to notice a distinct "wax" taste.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Big Grin

    Coyote,
    You crack me up!
    D.

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