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Thread: granulation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Lyme, NH, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    I wondered why my honey extracted in July did not granulate, while the honey from September granulated very rapidly. While reading Morse's "New Complete Guide to Beekeeping", I found that honey bottled while cold granulates more rapidly than warm honey, and that "Aster honey makes very poor winter food because it granulats so hard that it is difficult for the bees to remove it from the cells to the comb."
    Interesting...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    dahlonega,ga USA
    Posts
    39

    Post

    isn't the type of honey made a factor in its granulation? I know that the local store put up some honey from the cotton plants in south ga, and two weeks later it was turning to sugar.
    steve

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    wondered why my honey extracted in July did not granulate, while the honey from September granulated very rapidly. While reading Morse's "New Complete Guide to Beekeeping", I found that honey bottled while cold granulates more rapidly than warm honey.

    It was probably Goldenrod or Aster honey in the fall and that usually granulates in several weeks. When I do the late fall extracting I put the honey in 2 1/2 pound jars and keep it cool to encourage it to granulate then I sell it as spreadable honey for $7.50 a jar for local wildflower honey spread. I have many customers that will buy a case of it at a time (12 jars) and they keep coming back for it. I started doing this after people that I gave a small free sample of it started coming back for that wonderful creamed honey I made.
    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

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