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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

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    I've been feeding frames into one of my hives to get "natural" comb. The comb looks really nice, but a lot of it is really large cell.

    Some of this really large cell comb is now filled with capped brood. If this were on foundation, I would say it's worker brood. The cappings are flush with the comb. But I find it hard to believe that these are workers in such large cells. Will drones have bullet shaped cappings in these large cells or could these be drones with flat cappings?

    I should have moved these frames over to the side of the hive a little more quickly and maybe they would have filled them with nectar, but you know how schedules are.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    >Will drones have bullet shaped cappings in these large cells or could these be drones with flat cappings?

    Drones ALWAYS have domed cappings. Even if they are layed in worker cells.

    >I should have moved these frames over to the side of the hive a little more quickly and maybe they would have filled them with nectar, but you know how schedules are.

    That's probably what you should do with them now. Move them to the outside edge of the brood nest.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    Thanks Michael,

    I've now moved those frames to the sides and have slid a new empty frame into the center. I'm really hoping they will start drawing some smaller-than-foundation sized comb. So far, everything they have drawn in the empty frames is larger-than-foundation sized.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  4. #4

    Post

    Just put more frames in.First they build drone comb like mad,afther a while they start building worker cells.
    "Do nothing. Time is too precious to waste." Buddha

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hillsboro tx
    Posts
    50

    Post

    hi fellow beekeepers, forgive me for butting in but somthing in this post made me think,if i have a lot of small drones and no worker larvae then i probly dont have a queen(i usely put one frame with a starter strip so the bees will make there own drone cells,all the other frames are full foundation)is this right,i thought that maybe due to the drought that they may not be making new bees,(or fewer bees)now i dont know

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    >hi fellow beekeepers, forgive me for butting in but somthing in this post made me think,if i have a lot of small drones and no worker larvae then i probly dont have a queen(i usely put one frame with a starter strip so the bees will make there own drone cells,all the other frames are full foundation)is this right,i thought that maybe due to the drought that they may not be making new bees,(or fewer bees)now i dont know

    In a drought they usually won't rear new drones, although they may finish out some they've started. If you have drones (dome caps) in worker cells (5.5mm or smaller cells) then you have either a laying worker (in which case you'll see six or more eggs in many of the cells and often on the sides of the cells) or a drone laying queen (in which case you'll only see singles and occasional double eggs).
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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