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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    santa cruz, california
    Posts
    31

    Post

    Just wondering how folks do or do nothing with respect to water for your hives. Sometimes it gets pretty hot out here in my south facing backyard in Santa Cruz. I know there are stream sources within 1000 feet, but as I do fall into anthropomorphizing now and then, I think about something in the yard. A fountain, a bucket?

    What are you doing or not doing re water and why?
    Thanks, p.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    Hello palikaji--What we do for my bees would most likely not fit into the santa cruz decor! Placed an old claw foot bathtub into the ground twenty five feet from the bee yard at the outlet pipe of a wet weather spring. The spring keeps the tub filled until fall when things get real dry but have a backup plan--a water pipe just buried under the sod into the tub, turn a spigot at the house and the tub refills. Even get leapord frogs and crayfish taking up residence there. Works for us!
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hanson, MA & Lebanon, ME
    Posts
    696

    Post

    I bought little aquifers from Brushy Mountain because my neighbors have a pool. We've got three of them in a bit of an arc - and I do see bees in them.
    - Ann, a Gardening Beek

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Larkspur, Colorado
    Posts
    38

    Post

    I went to the Farm supply and picked up a couple of those poultry waterers. Filled the lip w/ some small pea gravel. Works great. Also set up a 5gal. pail with holes drilled a few inches from the top. Filled it with water and put some packing peanuts on top. Works great. When it rains the bucket filles to the holes and the float doesn't over run and fly away. Butterflies drink from it as well.
    Steven Lechner<br />steven_lechner@msn.com<br />303.657.5360

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Post

    Ann, how do they work? I was interested in one, but they don't even have a picture.

    My grandsons invented my waterer. It's a five gallon bucket with lots of sticks in it. The bees use the sticks as ladders.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6

    Post

    Heres a pic of one I built last Sat. Neighors where getting nervious because of bees sharing thier pool and bees didn't seem to prefer small pool I put out for them so I came up with this. My huntch is bees evaluate their water source the same as necture. Bigger v.s. smaller with tradeoffs with proximaty to hive playing into the picture soooooo using a small submersion pump from Harbor Freight for about $9.00, a 5 gallon bucket, 5 pound bag of fish tank gravel, a piece of 1/2 hose, a smidge of 1/8" hardware cloth plus odds and ends (couplers & tie wraps) I came up with this monstrosity.
    Basically 1/2" hose passes through lid up through stack where it is surrounded by gravel where it perculates through stones and screen down to lid where it filters back into bucket via holes drilled into lid.
    My thinking being the perculation will cuase a greater amount of water vapor to be released into the air creating a larger "footprint" in the air to which bees will sense a larger source of water than it actually is making it a preferable source as to next door pool. It's suppose to be up into the mid 90's the middle of the week so I should know soon enough. http://www.robleons.com/watersta.jpg

    For anyone that builds one quick suggestion. be sure to drill some small holes in the sides of bucket at the top before placeing on lid. It needs to 'breath' or a vacuum is created and water has a tendancy to not filter well through lid and pours over rim.

    [size="1"][ June 19, 2006, 09:09 PM: Message edited by: onlygoodSHBisdeadone ][/size]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    I just placed masonite feeders filled with water in all of my colonies. This may not have been such a great idea though, because the bees do not seem interested in the least. Go figure.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Ann........ Can you snap a pic of Eli's waterer???

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    A Miller type feeder works good when set out a few feet from the hives. The main reservoir of the feeder will need to be screened of course to keep bees from getting into it and drowning.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    santa cruz, california
    Posts
    31

    Post

    Thanks for all the great ideas. I love claw foot tubs outside - mostly so I could take a bath in it, but a self feeding spring - that's awesome and very chic for the bees! I also like sticks in a bucket, easy and cheap, but how often do you change the water I would think it could get funky? And I love the homemade bucket thingy too, let us know if they drink from it. I'd llike to see a picture of Eli's waterer too.

    I guess the general consensus is that you all believe you should provide some type of water. Thank you.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Larkspur, Colorado
    Posts
    38

    Post

    I use a hive top feeder w/ compartments - thought I had a great idea of putting water in one compartment and feed in the other. After just 2 days the inside of the cover was covered with mold right above the compartment filled with water. Also the water was very warm and the bees were not taking any of the water. I cleaned the mold off and now just put feed in the feeder. I use the system I wrote about above for water.
    Steven Lechner<br />steven_lechner@msn.com<br />303.657.5360

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hanson, MA & Lebanon, ME
    Posts
    696

    Post

    They're plastic tubs with a rimmed lip, mesh that covers the water and little floatie things that keep the net up. The bees walk on the net to get their drink - it seems to work well! I'll try to get a picture of one tomorrow and post it for you all.
    - Ann, a Gardening Beek

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    My bees found the bird bath. I'm Put a five gallon pail within a couple of inches of the bird bath and floated some lath in the bucket for a landing area. I then emptied the bird bath. The bees wandered around on the emptly bird bath for a few days, but never started using the bucket. I'm beginning to believe I have exceptionally stupid bees.

    [size="1"][ June 20, 2006, 07:02 PM: Message edited by: Hillside ][/size]
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  14. #14

    Post

    update--- temps today 94. when I got in this evening and checked water station had bees coming and going with 4-5 at any givin time on the colomb loading up. Interested to see what the next few days bring.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Corralitos, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,247

    Post

    Hi Palika,

    In my part of Santa Cruz County I have tubs with a few water plants, lilies, etc., and the bees use them quite nicely. A claw-footed tub would make a nice lily pond. The tree frogs will appreciate the addition to the landscape, although I know a local beekeeper who can't stand their chorusing, personally I enjoy it. I have mosquito fish in the tubs (Gambusia sp.) to take care of the mosquitos.

    Doug

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Post

    I bought one of those freestanding firepits, filled it with river rock and planted some pitcher plants in it. The bees love it. I just have to remember to fill it to the brim everyday because it evaporates fast!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    LINCOLN, ALABAMA
    Posts
    5

    Post

    A Boardman feeder with a quart jar works well here in Alabama.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Rome, GA
    Posts
    274

    Post

    I bought my bees a 40,000 gallon, in ground swimming pool. They love it.
    I've found it easier to keep bees than keep relationships. At least when I'm stung by bees I know why.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany /Europe
    Posts
    126

    Post

    #lol
    I have some flat tables with a rim, lined with plastic, from a garden center.
    I put a wooden swimmer inside and spice up the water with 1tsp VitC and a pich of salt per 10l or 2,5gallons.
    The bees love it.
    But nevertheless they prefer the muddy and algae containing water of my next neighbour's pond.
    On my waterers are about 200-300 bees/ square meter, at the rim of that d***** pond are more than 1000 in the heat of noon......
    #grummel
    Sincerely
    Alienor

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    A thousand feet is close enough for a water supply. But if you have the time, build a bee watering pond: [img]smile.gif[/img]

    http://members.aol.com/glennapiar/beepond.html

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