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Thread: Parafin wax

  1. #1
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    Can melted parafin be used to cement waxed foundation strips into top bars? I know bees wax is used, but I don't have any right now.
    Thanks, Art

  2. #2
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    Put an ad in the "Wanted" section or go on ebay.

    Beeswax is the only way to go. I think it has a lower melt point.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Bees-Wax-5-lbs-o...QQcmdZViewItem

  3. #3
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    >>Beeswax is the only way to go.

    Why?

    I've used parafin and don't see any problem with it.

    If you melted down your comb, you would slightly contaminate your beeswax, but if that is not a concern, what is the problem?

  4. #4
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    Of course parafin will work. But in light of this question being in a "biological beekeeping" section I think it is a poor choice.

    I personally use it because I have it, it is natural, it requires no petroleum, the bees like it, and smells excellent!!

  5. #5
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    Also if you have to buy beeswax some beekeeper is making a dollar and not petroleum corporations. Makes me feel warm and fuzzy...

  6. #6
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    Agreed. Beeswax smells better, works better, and has better karma. But if you don't have any, parafin will do until you get some.

  7. #7
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    Parafin has mixed into foundations and bees cannot make good combs. It is harmfull stuff in beewax.

  8. #8
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    Nowdays beeswax is nearly as easy as getting parafin. Why screw around??

  9. #9
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    Buy a 100% beeswax candle and you can use it to dribble the wax in and you won't have to use parafin. Parafin is not a good idea.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
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    I haven't tried it, but I figure that using a beeswax candle (available at crafts and home decore stores, etc) could simply be burned and dripped into spots along the foundation. kind of like tack-welding. Of course, a candle will cost you more than the wax in a block from a local beekeeper. Check your association.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  11. #11
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    I agree with the "it's ok to use" crowd. Oh wait, there was only one guy who said it was ok to use. Well, I agree with him. It's not like an entire parafin brick is needed to tack the foundation in place.

  12. #12
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    Hey, some of you beekeepers near Lodi, CA. Send Art a little chunk of beeswax.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  13. #13
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    Sure its "OK", so is silicone caulking, glue sticks, and melted tupperware. But nothing is as good as bees wax. And its not like its a rare commodity.

  14. #14
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    Well, isn't that what the question was about in the first place? Is it OK? Yes, it is. So there. [img]tongue.gif[/img]

    edited: besides, parafin is used for waxing jam and jelly. Now, what about all that food grade MINERAL OIL? Where is that derived from? So there again.

    [size="1"][ May 08, 2006, 10:29 PM: Message edited by: Dick Allen ][/size]

  15. #15
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    OK, both substances are OK, as long as you DO NOT CONSIDER THEM TO BE THE SAME. To me, the real danger lies in relaxing so much as to loose sight of the differences.

    Honey and sugar are both sweet, natural and delicious, aren`t they? But they are not the same!!

  16. #16
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    It is not natural question. Paraffin is not beewax as stuff. Bees's instinct don't understand the stuff because it has not got chemistry lessons.

    Parafin is from nature. It is sure.

  17. #17
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    What about the melting temps? If the paraffin (and I don't know) has a significantly higher melting point, it may simply melt the foundation rather than adhere to it. Hmm, let me try this...

    Ok, I dribbled a melting candle on the edge of a peice of foundation. The tiniest of drops did "thin" the beeswax which seemed to absorb the heat and kept the paraffin from cooling quickly. I'm sure that a thick bead of paraffin would simply cut through the beeswax. This would not result in the desired "cementing" under the conditions that I tried. Again, small tack-welding might, but care would have to be taken to allow the paraffin to cool before stress was put on the area.

    I take the question to imply, "will it work without causing harm." I don't think it will work as well as hoped.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  18. #18
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    Melting temps are:

    beeswax 62-65 degrees C
    paraffin 47-65 degrees C

    Using a waxing tube, paraffin anchors beeswax foundation just fine. No problems. But always remember - beeswax is better.

    Art, did we answer your question?

  19. #19
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    Thanks Patrick,
    I sit corrected.
    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  20. #20
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    The wide range in paraffin is due to the additives used for candles etc. Food grade paraffin has a higher, narrower melt point.

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