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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    79

    Post

    Does anyone have any experience with Queens from B. Weaver? Check out what they say about their queens: http://www.beeweaver.com/home.php?cat=1

    No chemicals, rescue failing hives.

    Thanks,

    DougR

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Post

    >Too good to be true?

    Probably.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    839

    Post

    unless they changed somthing in the last year it was too good to be true for us. I think it was 2 years ago we ordered 20 queens, 10 buckfast and ten all americans. We even treated them with FMGO. But half still died in the winter im not saying it was totaly a mite problem but they were plenty of mites falling through the SBB. regards Nick

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Marshall, VA USA
    Posts
    136

    Post

    I haven't ordered anything from them because I can't see how they prevent Africanized stock from getting into the breeding program. Unless they artificially inseminate all their queens it's bound to happen. Better to raise your own I guess. I've been very happy with the NWC stock I got from Strachan out in CA. But...that wasn't your question.

    Mike
    If you're not confused you just don't know what's going on.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    >To good to be true?

    Michael
    This is what all breeders and beekeepers should be striving to achieve.You will most likely find they are doing this on large cell (5.4) as we are in New Zealand.(findings/obsevations in short time with smaller cell are very interesting) We have made a discovery in recent days regarding cell size that has gone unnoticed in New Zealand since 1996,predating the arrival of varroa by some 4 plus years.Working with bees resistant to varroa gets more exciting each year.But first you have to be able to select and work with such bees,measure results without use of chemicals and biotecnical means (no SBB or drone trapping) and find ways that overcome the invasion period with such bees at season end.
    BOB

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    >plenty of mites falling through the SBB

    If this was natural drop at season end I would observe those mites for damage.Hives like this could very well have been your best.
    BOB

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Post

    >This is what all breeders and beekeepers should be striving to achieve.

    Certainly.

    >You will most likely find they are doing this on large cell (5.4)

    I have my doubts this is possible. But certainly you can breed them to do better or worse on unnatrual comb.

    I haven't had Weaver's queens since they have made this claim, so I can't say, but the last ones I had died of Varroa.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Wow......... Big Claims...... Do they do housework too??

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    839

    Post

    >If this was natural drop at season end I would observe those mites for damage.Hives like this could very well have been your best.

    it very well could have been our best hives but they all died during the winter so i couldnt have been all that great. Nick

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    514

    Post

    I ordered 100 queens (All Stars) from B. Weaver in the Spring of 2005. Here's my observations of them:

    - good honey producers
    - brood chambers seemed heavier in the Fall compared to my other hives
    - bees from these hives were much more defensive compared to my other hives
    - I did treat them for Varroa in the Fall (Oxalic)
    - more seemed to survive the Winter than my other hives (this was in the central valley in CA, mind you); I did not lose many overall

    Summary: I did like them in spite of their more aggressiveness and was going to order more this Spring, until I found out the price, if I remember correctly was $17 each for 100 or more. Decided to pass.
    Gregg Stewart

  11. #11

    Post

    We started with 2 hives last May...one Russian and one All American queen.

    I have not done any chemical treatements, not even soft chemical at this point. I put in grease patties last Nov and have done 1 powder sugar dusting in March.

    I've checked mite drops twice using a sticky board...the first check was after the sugar dusting....the 2nd check was about a month later.

    The Russian hive had 10 mites, the All American hive had 27/28 mites.

    The hives seems about equal in strenght and development at this point. I'll be opening them up again in a few days to see how they are progressing along.

    Oh and their temperment seems about the same...both hives are pretty gentle.

    I will say I am concerned about the AHB factor due to the location of Weaver even though this queen appears to be fine.

    I have two more queens coming this month from other suppliers...a Russian (fatbeeman) and a NWC (Mike Singleton).


    LaRae

    [size="1"][ May 04, 2006, 03:38 PM: Message edited by: LaRae ][/size]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    >I have my doubts this is possible

    I have been in touch with Mrs.Weaver regarding the cell size in their breeding operation.Danny will be coming back to me with answers on this.
    BOB

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    79

    Post

    I asked the fellow that answered the phone last year (from B Weaver) about small cell. He just laughed and said he though that it was all a bunch baloney (not a quote). Funny how nobody is willing to believe each other when everyone is seeking the same results - no chemical, mite resistant hives. I guess I'm just gullible and willing to try anything.

    Doug

    [size="1"][ May 05, 2006, 12:51 PM: Message edited by: Doug R ][/size]

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    >Funny how nobody is willing to believe each other when everyone is seeking the same results - no chemical, mite resistant hives.

    The following is the reply from Danny Weaver today regarding the cell size in their operation. I will share it with the group.

    Howdy Bob,
    We operate using principally comb drawn from standard commercially
    available foundation. I do think that it is likely that one could
    achieve success more easily with smaller cell dimensions - but our
    success has not been contingent upon that constraint.
    Best,
    Danny

    The above is likewise for my own operation after 6 years selecting and breeding bees resistant to varroa as it is for the others that are now also doing likewise in New Zealand.It is possible to do so and is being done on commercial foundation.However after a partial set up trial with smaller cell over our past season I can say the results thus far are very encouraging and are to be continued until we can prove one way or the other.Will share shortly a discovery in regards to commercial cell size that has gone unnoticed in New Zealand since 1967.
    BOB

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    839

    Post

    i will say for the record that we got some more buckfast from them last year and this time we put them on small cell they are probably the best queens we have, wall to wall brood, hardly ate any honey this winter, they draw out great small cell. And are just really growing. They are not he most gental bee but not bad i can work them with out gloves yet. So yea i guess they can survive with out and mite treatments but MOST queens seem to be able to on small cell. Any way we are graphting off one of the buckfast queens this year. regards Nick

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    My first requeening was from B. Weaver. The bees did well. The supercedure queens were hot, but I've heard that's typical of most second-generations. Besides, it was only 2 such situations, so not necessarily a good representation of the hundreds they sell each year.

    I wasn't able to go for long without treating, but I can't claim that the hives I lost were first generation B.Weaver queens anyway.

    The people are nice and have had me over for lunch.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

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