Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Washington County, NY
    Posts
    115

    Post

    Just built my first hive, and would like to protect it with something natural/non-toxic. Any suggestions? Does anyone have experience with linseed oil? Other oil? Wax?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Some paints are approved for "food contact".

  3. #3

    Post

    You can use linseed oil.But the the problem is you have to do it every year.
    "Do nothing. Time is too precious to waste." Buddha

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >You can use linseed oil.But the the problem is you have to do it every year.

    That's only if you're a model beekeeper, an upstanding citizen, conscientious, fastidious in every way, and without sloth. Otherwise, one coat of linseed oil is good for a lifetime!

    Linseed oil is of course very good for wood. So good in fact that you can just pretend to treat your hives with it and they'll last longer. If you go so far as to actually put some on them, who knows how long they'll last! The only downside to it is that it looks awful, even worse than untreated wood and you're likely to get complaints from the neighbors or your spouse about what appears to be a small third-world country slum in your backyard. The effect is enhanced by not mowing the grass because you don't want to cut down the forage, using flattened tin cans or duct tape to patch holes in the boxes and other cost-savng efforts like reusing last year's tar paper for winter wrapping. Open feeding with rusty old 55 gallon drums or used 5 gallon plastic pails enhances the effect. All this because you decided to treat your hive bodies with linseed oil.

    Has anyone any idea how many lins died to make a pint of linseed oil? I don't, was just wondering [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Dulcius ex asperis

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    >That's only if you're a model beekeeper, an upstanding citizen, conscientious, fastidious in every way, and without sloth.

    Thank you George, but now you sound like my mother [img]smile.gif[/img]

    >one coat of linseed oil is good for a lifetime!
    Colony lifetime = 1 to 3 years
    Hive's wood lifetime = maybe 10 years
    Beekeepers lifetime = 100 years?

    >idea how many lins died to make a pint of linseed oil?

    Silly, the stuff comes out of the ground (oil wells). A lady, named "Lin" makes its (her last name is really spelled "Sead").

    Want to buy a bridge? [img]smile.gif[/img]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >Thank you George, but now you sound like my mother

    Doh!

    >Silly, the stuff comes out of the ground (oil wells).

    No! Refined petroleum? Say it isn't so! I thought it came from trees, like turpentine or something. I guess some research is in order- always a good idea when made to look stoopid by a fastidious mite counter [img]smile.gif[/img]

    >Want to buy a bridge?

    Not today, I'm investing all my available cash in a lin farm.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Hah! Dave you was misinformed:

    "Linseed oil, extracted from flax seed, is one of the most useful natural oils. It is used as a preservative for wood, concrete, and an ingredient in paints, varnishes, and stains. As if that wasn't enough, it is also used in soaps, inks, and in the production of linoleum! Note that the first three letters of linoleum are lin... for linseed!"

    Course, you can't believe everything you read on the internet... and who knew concrete even needed a preservative?
    Dulcius ex asperis

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    The best linseed oil is produced here in New Zealand.Read more here about The Good Oil:

    http://tinyurl.com/j5t4h

    We have brood boxes that were treated with just linseed oil 15 years ago.We also have brood boxes wax dipped 40 years ago (dated inside box).We do have boxes made from Macrocarpa that need no treatment what so ever that will never rot provided they do not come in direct contact with the ground.Then there are our native timbers like Kauri,Rimu,Totara that also need no treatment.During the war years many beehives in New Zealand were also made from butter boxes produced from(Kihikatea or New Zealand white pine)non tainting.

    Just a word of warning if treating with linseed oil.

    NEVER lEAVE OILY RAG IN SHED WHERE TEMPERATURE RISES (spontaneous combustion burnt a beekeepers shed down just a couple miles away from me after treating hiveware with Linseed oil.

    [size="1"][ May 06, 2006, 12:08 PM: Message edited by: Bob Russell ][/size]
    BOB

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    >NEVER lEAVE OILY RAG IN SHED WHERE TEMPERATURE RISES (spontaneous combustion burnt a beekeepers shed down just a couple miles away from me after treating hiveware with Linseed oil.

    I've noticed that some linseed oil seems to react chemically with the rags and cause this. Other brands don't seem to. I've wondered what the difference is. But you do not want to put the used rags anywhere they will not be safe bursting into flames. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    >one coat of linseed oil is good for a lifetime!
    Colony lifetime = 1 to 3 years
    Hive's wood lifetime = maybe 10 years
    Beekeepers lifetime = 100 years?

    Off-topic comment:
    Recently, a doctor on the radio answered the question regarding the longevity of heart transplant patients. His sincere answer, "There's no reason a person with a transplanted heart can't live out the rest of their lives."

    I would say That's Great News!

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Using "normal" beekeeper logic, I reckon since Linseed oil is a "natural" product, it must be a good mite treatment, too [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Again, George has got it right, "Course, you can't believe everything you read on the internet".

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    >Hive's wood lifetime = maybe 10 years

    I've got some 32 year old boxes with bees still in them. They are looking a bit worse for the wear, but they are still doing their job.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Forest, VA
    Posts
    44

    Post

    Hey, check out www.milkpaint.com. All natural paints come in lots of lovely colors! I don't know about their preservative properties, but they sure are nice paints. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    I just use barn and fence paint. Its like $50 for 5 gallons. Its latex based and it does have anti-microbial agents, but I did the research and it won't get into your honey. Its in too small a concentration to effect anything except something that literally tries to grow and live on it.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  15. #15

    Post

    On an almost similar note...

    The Solicitor commenting on a recent Murder case here said "We have determined that the murderer was the last person to see her alive".

    Now... thats brilliant.

    I used latex. But am looking around for a clear finish for a Cypress made English Garden Hive... for show ya know. Any suggestions?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    How about melted beeswax. [img]smile.gif[/img] It's a wonderful preservative for wood.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Madison Heights VA
    Posts
    396

    Post

    Boil in parafin wax.
    Curtis
    Curtis

  18. #18

    Post

    Now that's a thought!

    I don't suppose I could get lucky enough to find anyone that has a picture of a Bee's wax finish onto natural wood... like Cypress?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    597

    Post

    Here you see 40 years old boxes. I made them year 1966. Wood has one layer of outdoor latex.

    Thin layer is important that moisture comes out from wood.

    Paint is important that all kind of dirty and honey from hands does not go inside wood.

    Boxes are only tools, not show busines.

    If you like nice hives here is excample:

    .

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    597

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads