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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Question

    It's been a long time since I used this method. But looking at the drone life cycle, I've got that they are capped on day 9-10 and emerge on day 22-23. Are these figures true? And if so, then it seems I should leave the comb in a Minimum of 10 days for them to be capped and varroa trapped. But I can leave them in up to 21 days to get the most use of the comb (more eggs laid and more cells capped) without the drones and varroa emerging. (Though this would pose a risk if weather or other prevented removal of the comb on Day 21. That might be cutting it Too Close.)

    Anyway,if I have the timing right, then this is basically an "Every 2-3 week" manipulation. Right?

    I need to know this, not only to have the info, but I'll be starting packages in 2 weeks, so I need to time when to get drone eggs laid and ready so to trap as many varroa off my new packages as possible.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    597

    Post

    When you have bare bees, it is easy to kill mites from bees with some treatment. You take queen away and give treatment: lactic acid, oxalic acid ... So so see how much you have.

    If you dont like that, give drone are to bees.
    You put medium foundation to Langstroth frame. So they have a gap wher they make drone cells. But I suppse that mites go into worker cells at first because they develope faster.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >I've got that they are capped on day 9-10 and emerge on day 22-23.

    Pretty much yes, from when the egg hatches. Without consulting my notes I think from when the egg is laid (day 0) they're capped on day 9 or 10 and emerge on day 24 so you've got a week there to play with.

    At least the first time around, you've got to factor in the time it takes them to draw the drone comb out.

    Personally Waya, I'd let your packages build up some and get established before giving them drone comb, especially if you're starting them on foundation and even if you're giving them some drawn comb. Package populations dwindle quite a bit for the first 4-6 weeks as older bees die off and before new bees emerge, depending on how you introduce your queen. If you're starting them on some drawn comb they'll get on their feet a little faster but I still wouldn't want them to waste their resources on drone brood at a time when they need new workers, and lots of them.

    I'm getting a package on April 22 myself and don't plan on giving them any drone comb for a couple of months. By then they should be booming.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,361

    Post

    I would go for two weeks, then if you forget you can get them on three.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    Sounds good, Michael.

    Thanks, George.
    These will be given drawn comb all around (SC worker with pollen and honey, and LC Drone with brood ). You're right, putting a burden on a package would not be nice. I'm glad you brought that up.
    All they'll have to do with the drone larvae is cap it if I get it into an existing hive say 9 days in advance. Would that do? Or still too harsh for a package?

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >All they'll have to do with the drone larvae is cap it if I get it into an existing hive say 9 days in advance. Would that do? Or still too harsh for a package?

    I'll be honest Waya, I'll be hiving my first package this spring [img]smile.gif[/img] you'll have to get some opinions from people that actually know what they're talking about. I have heard that a 3# package with say, 10,000 bees in it will dwindle by a good 1/3 in the first 4-5 weeks before new brood emerges and starts to make up the difference. You can cut this time by using drawn comb and releasing the queen immediately. I guess I'd still be more inclined to jump start the package than I would be thrashing the varroa, assuming you even have an appreciable varroa population in your package to start with. You could be bleeding before you're shot.

    That said, I like the way you're thinking. A newly hived package is the perfect situation for varroa treatment, and taking a frame of drone larvae from another hive and putting it into your new package hive for them to cap, why those varroa won't stand a chance. This is the premise behind the Dutch/NZ method of splitting for varroa control.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    George,
    That's what I was thinking to (Dutch/ NZ method).

    And, funny thing, this will be MY first packages too. I'm interested in how clumsy I'll turn out to be with what is considered a newbee's skill.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  8. #8

    Lightbulb

    Hi guys,
    Why not spray the bees with sucrocide mite spray.
    It is a totaly organic spray that kills 98% or more of varoa mites. It is a little time consuming but I know of several other beekeepers who do it. You do not need to take the queen out, matter of fact you can spray her if you want to. You can fnd out more at by clicking here. They say in the article that you need to spray the bees three seperate times, but that is only if there is capped brood in the hive. I did it and it works well. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Make sure you join a beekeeping association that is near you to keep beekeeping going. You can find a list of all the beekeeping associations at <a href=\"http://www.beeculture.com.\" target=\"_blank\">www.beeculture.com.</a>

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Micah . . .

    I used Suckercide for an entire season. I pulled frames and I sprayed between frames.

    Based on weekly mites counts from entire year before treatment, and numbers during treatments, and then AFTER treatments, Suckercide was NOT shown to be effective (hive died following winter).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Lyndon, KS
    Posts
    353

    Post

    I had good succes with sucrocide and like it for its organic properties.......but I must admit I LOVE my SC bees because they require NO treatments.
    You have to stop and smell the roses......but please watch out for my bees.
    www.johnwaynehoney.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    597

    Post

    Spring and summer is difficult time to cure varroa because mites are mostly under brood caps.
    Here is method how to catch 95% of mites away from colony with drone brood.

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~jtemp/dronemethod.html
    .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Flewster . . .

    Please explain the connection of "good succes with sucrocide" and "SC bees require NO treatments".

    thanx.

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