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Thread: SC and the SHB

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
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    5,292

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    Around here any store that carries pool supplies, even WalMart carry it for filter media.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
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    2,790

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    Interesting thread. . . . [img]smile.gif[/img] I'm not so sure that DE is as dangerous to bees and most other insects as has been suggested here. DE, as far as I understand it, works by abraiding the insects as they push or burrow through it. The diatoms (where the name "diatomaceous" comes from) build little shells out of silica (like glass), and when they die, the shells remain. These shells are the component in the DE that makes it effective. Like broken glass, the shells of the diatoms cut and scrape at the "skin" of insects that are pushing through it. As long as no force is applied against the shells by the insects, I would figure that DE would have little or no effect on them.

  3. #23

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    Insects have no clotting ability. The smallest cut of the exoskeleton,this includes their little feet, will result in them "leaking" or dehidrating to death as the fluid balance can not be maintained. Trust me on this one. You will have dead bees if they are exposed.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
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    2,790

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    "Insects have no clotting ability. The smallest cut of the exoskeleton,this includes their little feet, will result in them "leaking" or dehidrating to death as the fluid balance can not be maintained. Trust me on this one." -onlygoodSHBisdeadone

    Actually, no. They may not form "clots" like mammals do, but it's absolutely not true that any little abrasion or cut will results in them "leaking" to death. Think of how many insects you see that have had amputations of legs, yet still survive for long periods after that. Some (especially walking sticks) can even begin to regrow legs if an amputation occurs early in the life of the insect.

    Besides that, who says that bees walking across diatomaceous earth will cut themselves?

    But, I'm game -- I'll test it out on some bees once the bees get to moving (it's still winter here in SD). I'll sprinkle some DE on one group of bees, and plain ol' "non-diatomaceous" earth (as a control) on another group. We'll see if there's a significant difference in the survival of the two groups.

  5. #25

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    By all means if in doubt test.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

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    And I'm also curious to hear the result of your experiment, Kieck.

    >So far I've been keeping numbers in check using dietomacous earth on the SBB insert board.<

    I think that was Onlygood...'s original point, keep DE only on the SBB insert so that it is out of reach of the bees.
    I've noticed a great many larva on my greased SBB insert. So, I'm hoping that a well-sprayed SBB insert will keep the larva from crawling over the side of the insert and reaching the ground.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
    Posts
    475

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    not that there seems to be any doubt about it, but here as well, SC has no effect on SHB at all in my experience.

    My problem with the whole killing-the-larvae with plastic etc., once you have larvae leaving the hive, it's WAY too late already in my experience. It may save your other hives, but once I see an infestation, those larvae see the undersides of my shoes or I drown them in a bucket of water(are they good chicken food?). From what I've seen, either you have a small stable population of SHB(and you never see larvae) or it's full-on SHB blitzkrieg assault with larvae overtaking everything. I haven't found a hive with just a few SHB and just a few larvae.

    also I sure wouldn't want my bees near DE, sounds like a really, really...really bad idea.
    Ask two beekeepers, get three answers

  8. #28

    Post

    > also I sure wouldn't want my bees near DE, sounds like a really, really...really bad idea.

    Yes it can be just as any chemical treatment is if not presented in a safe manner. I've been using it for a year now with no ill effects on the bees and no build up of chemicals in the wax which is possable with the use or other treatments even when used according to proper application.

    Just for information test splits were done on two hives last Friday. Hives at time of split showed an estamated count of 5-10 beetles. Sunday evening inspection of split hives insert boards where 89, 67, 10, 0. These counts lead me to believe others were attracted from other hives as the highest count in any one colony in the yard was 27. Point being without DE I feel these newcomers would be live and well doing significant damage to splits instead of dead on the insert. If anything else the sight of dead beetles on the board looks much better then couple thousand squirming larvee.
    Unfortunately past two days have been rainy so I haven't been able to inspect frames but will post as soon as I do.

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