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Thread: SC and the SHB

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Guys,

    A phone call from a small cell beekeeper got me to thinking about the shb and sc. I haven't seen any shb in my hives and so I don't have any personal experience with them. But the recent failures of a sc package and queen supplier, attributed to an shb infestation, isn't a very good indicator that sc has much effect on the shb.

    Anyone have any experiences to share?

    Regards
    Dennis
    Thinking I'd better get smarter about shb before I move from Wy to Fl.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    I've still never seen one in my hives. I saw a lot of them last week in North Carolina. They didn't seem to be causing any problems.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3

    Post

    I have plenty of SHB in my colonies. They don't appear to do significant damage as long as the colony is healthy and vigorous.....so far. My guess is that the same will hold true for SC. If what the SC advocates say is true..that their colonies are healthier, then I expect that SHB will only be a nuisance.
    By the way, which SC package and queen supplier failed due to SHB...just curious.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,274

    Post

    How would cell size have any impact on SHB?
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    All my hives in AL had SHB including the SC ones. And it wasn't only a few beetles either.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  6. #6

    Post

    Wayacoyote-- doesn't look good for Alabama this year. Have a feeling everyone locals going to have a go around with SHB this year if they didn't last. Good luck. So far I've been keeping numbers in check using dietomacous earth on the SBB insert board.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    Good luck to you too.

    I've reduced my SHB's to near indetectable levels (haven't seen one for quite a while) by using the oil-pan SHB traps that go on bottom boards. Diatomacious earth is probably a good idea. I hear fireants are helpful too. Me, I spread a plastic sheet under the hive to keep them from reaching earth to mature. It also keeps the grass down.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wetumpka, Alabama USA
    Posts
    87

    Post

    Waya,
    How large an area around the hives are you covering with the plastic sheets?
    Did you get your shb oil-pan traps from Rossman?
    These shb may be the undoing of lots of beekeepers this year. I will try all the above, but I might have to resort to checkmight.
    luck to you.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    hmm

    dietomacous earth
    I happen to have a 40 lb bag of it laying around
    I have yet to see a SHB but I'm sure they're going to show up
    you do what, put it on the slide it tray?
    what does this do, kill the larvea?

    Dave

  10. #10

    Post

    Hi Dave.
    Yes, You want to place DE on tray out of reach of bees. If your screen is #8 the SHB can pass through as well a larvea and and DE will take them out as well.

    Bob

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wausau Wi
    Posts
    310

    Post

    Where do you get your DE from, and how much are you paying? It may even work on mites too.
    Everything happens for a reason. Time heals all wounds - time and a half heals them even faster

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

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    >It may even work on mites too.

    And maybe even bees...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

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    I have thought about trying it on bees but was afraid it might kill them
    I'd definately try a "DE roll" first
    I had to order mine off the web, it's not real easy to find
    people use it on chickens to kill mites and dogs to kill fleas

    http://www.biconet.com/crawlers/DE.html

    Dave

    [size="1"][ March 14, 2006, 02:59 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ][/size]

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

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    Drugstore,
    The SHB traps came from Dadant. They're the plastic ones which you fill with oil. Make sure your bottom board is PERFECTLY flat. A slight imperfection, and the oil won't spread over the whole tray.

    As for the plastic sheeting under the hives. The state apiarist said that Guardstar has to be spread 18" around the hive. I took that to mean the distance that a SHB larvae can or will move. So I make sure the plastic reaches 24" just to be sure. Totally untested. But it would make for an interesting research opportunity.

    And that the people whose yard the hives are in raise chickens also helps. Of course fireants would help if you have a colony nearby.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wetumpka, Alabama USA
    Posts
    87

    Post

    Waya,
    Thanks for your reply. I guess I am more worried about the shb than I am about varroa.
    I prefer the oil-pan shb traps over the chemicals.
    Having chickens in an apiary might really be the way to go.
    My Granfather always kept his beehives in his chicken yard. They took care of bugs, ants, and even grass around the hives.

  16. #16

    Post

    Yes DE will kill bees if they come in contact so be shure to isolate with no larger than #8 screen so bees do not have access. Co-ops usaully carry it and goes for about $4.00 for a 20lb bag. Just be shure that the only active ingredient is DE and doesn't contain chemical pesticides. Again do not let the bees come in contact with DE as it will kill them.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Post

    There seems to be a misconception that placing a hive on top of plastic or something will keep the SHB larvae from finding a place in the dirt to pupate. According to this study, the larvae can crawl over 200 meters looking for soil:

    Ref page 18 of "Study of the SHB in the USA"
    www.rirdc.gov.au/reports/HBE/03-050.pdf

    Triangle Bees

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,742

    Post

    >the larvae can crawl over 200 meters looking for soil

    Over black plastic when the outside temps are 100 F and the plastic is hot enough to sizzle?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Post

    They may be just dumb larvae but they know enough not to crawl out onto sizzling black plastic. They wait until cool evening -- fewer predators and no frying. These larvae are tough, leathery, skinny -- I doubt a bee could kill one by biting or stinging (she would probably just carry it out of the hive and drop it somewhere).
    Triangle Bees

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Rome, GA
    Posts
    274

    Post

    You can get large bags of clean, high quality diatomaceous earth at most swimming pool supply stores. DE is used in many pool filters. I have a pool and use the same DE by spreading it around my hives. I still see a few SHB, but not many.

    As far as SHB larvae crawling, Dr. Jamie Ellis (Univ. of GA) said that he once left a container of SHB larvae open in the laboratory one evening. This next morning they had crawled down two flights of stairs and were headed down the hall toward the door.
    I've found it easier to keep bees than keep relationships. At least when I'm stung by bees I know why.

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