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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Posts
    3

    Smile

    Hi all,

    I'm a relatively new forum member and am planning to start biological beekeeping in spring 2006, as the first (or the second)such beekeeper in Serbia.

    What I'm interested in is how to paint the beehives: linenseed oil would do good at preservation, but I am thinking about propolis oil solution as a final paint. What are the experiences, if any?

    If not propolis, what else, what are the materials of choice?

    Thanks in advance,

    Dragan, Belgrade, Serbia

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    I often don't get around to painting mine at all. [img]smile.gif[/img] But I do like the linseed oil.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Post

    How long will the linseed oil protect the wood?

    I guess I'm trying to figure out how often it would have to be reapplied.

    [size="1"][ October 14, 2005, 01:30 PM: Message edited by: dtwilliamson ][/size]
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    I've never bothered to reapply it. But then, I often don't bother to apply it. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    It doesn't last forever but it soaks in. I think it will do SOME good from that point on, but I would guess it would be helpful to reapply it periodically.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Posts
    3

    Post

    Linseed oil without propolis is fine with me [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Simply, I am trying to persuade some fellow beekeepers in Serbia to give up on used transformator oil (yuck) for their hive protection - the beautiful reddish propolis colour may be of some help in this regard. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    Used transformer oil????? Are you talking about PCB oils? Around here, that would make your apiary a hazardous waste site.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Posts
    3

    Post

    Actually, there's a ongoing discussion among some beekeepers about the used transformer oil. As the matter of fact, in Serbia the pyralen based oil was seldom used in transformers.

    In any case, the fellow beekeepers are aware of the PCB hazards (though not so biologically aware, I'm afraid!) and think about using the petroleum based oil without polychlorobiphenyls(sorry if the terminology isn't correct, not that familiar with the matter). Which is not much different from what I saw in some beekeepers' lists - using fuel oil (diesel) as a means of protection...

    Basically, that means that the apiaries wouldn't be hazardous, just smelling like fuel oil.

    However, I *am* and will always be very repulsive as to that and will keep on missionary work to spread the general idea and benefits of the biological beekeeping.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    Polycholrobiphenyls used to be in oil in the transformers here. I don't know when they stopped making them that way, but a lot of them were still that way back in the late 70's.

    Nasty, dangerous stuff.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,020

    Post

    I use a mix of 1 part old beeswax (containing propolis) with 9 parts linseed oil, applied hot.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Post

    buckbee said:

    >>applied hot.

    do you dip it? or paint it on hot? And how hot?
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,020

    Post

    I heat the oil, melt the beeswax into it and apply with a brush before it has time to go mushy. Yep, it's that technical!

    Dipping would work fine, assuming a big tank full of oil and wax...

    The end result is a waterproof finish that is a little on the slippery side, but you can polish off the excess easily enough. Hot sun will soften it, of course, but it just seems to soak further into the wood. I apply it fresh each season and it seems to do the job with no risk of poisoning anything.

    Propolis doesn't mix too well with oils, so it may be better to dissolve it in alcohol first and add it to the hot mix - dunno, haven't tried it yet.

    Also, it may benefit from a little carnauba wax to harden it up.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Guatemala
    Posts
    244

    Post

    Guatemalan beekeepers seldom paint their hive equipment. Now that we have bee warned about strictly no contaminant residues of any kind, unprotected bee equipment is at higher risk of becoming a large cost issue. Tropical weather really takes a toll on wooden ware, and the result is deacaying hives. I personally think that lead-free water based paints or perfectly OK as long as no paint is scraped along burr comb and ends up in the honey.
    Since bottom boards are very likely to rot from inside moisture, the perfect alternative is a screen bottom elevated some 18n inches from the soil. Still, rain splashes on the side rails, so a coat or two of paint should make your screem bottoms last a long time.
    In any case, I would not dip boxes unless the product is absolutely odor free and non contaminating, like very hot paraffin.

    [size="1"][ October 22, 2005, 09:47 PM: Message edited by: guatebee ][/size]

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