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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    After reading through numurous threads about different methoeds of mite control, I thought it might be helpful to the new folk (me included) to have all the different methoeds included in one thread to make reading and understanding these methoeds alittle bit easier. So if you guys would be so kind as to discuss methoeds and procudures for different treatments here it would really help.
    Some of the ones I know about are:
    powdered sugar: what kind of sugar do you use? (don't go gee powdered sugar either ) According to Mann Lake's catalog there is a specfic sugar, but I have questions as to wether plain old powdered sugar would work as well and be cheaper).
    FGMO
    OA
    Things put in smoker:
    Tobacco (I heard this was toxic to bees?)
    Sumac
    Black walnuts
    These lists go on and on, maybe we could put it all together so we don't keep asking the same questions over and over. Thanks.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    MN
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    17

    Post

    Mann Lake sells a Wooden Varoa Screen Trap. You use your regular bottom board. The space that is created allows mites to fall through to the bottom so they can't crawl back into the hive. The catalog says that it is to be used on conjunction with a sticky board. The one that I got is a drawer style so I don't need to remove the hive bodies to clean the bottom board. I have heard that one can just spray the drawer with PAM or some other sooking spray the mites stick to the spray. I am told this will reduce mite populations by 40%.
    \"I\'m new here, Please be gentle with me\"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
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    2,027

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    Regarding the use of powdered suger: found this link on another thread; it was simple enough for a beginner like me to understand:
    http://bwrangler.madpage.com/bee/blas.htm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Totnes, Devon, England
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    Plain old icing (powdered) sugar does knock at least some mites down and is at least non-toxic to everything else. Must be kept bone dry though as it is hygroscopic.

    Screened bottom boards stop stray live mites from migrating back into the hive, so certainly help, esp. in monitoring the effectiveness of other treatments.

    Tubular hive bottoms (a row of parallel plastic tubes/pipes with 1-2mm gaps, arranged vertically below frames) are said to be v. effective.

    Organic acids work but need very careful handling and dosing.

    Some swear by small cell; I prefer natural cell (as in TBHs). Less stress for bees, less room for varroa.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Try a search of this forum on whatever method you want to research. There is tons of information on all of them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Buckbee:

    I suspect small cell and natural cell are one and the same.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    I prefer natural cell (as in TBHs). Less stress for bees, less room for varroa.
    Buckbee, are you using only natural cell or are you also using other methods for varroa control?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >I suspect small cell and natural cell are one and the same.

    Kind of sort of. 4.9mm foundation will result in more uniform cells than natrual cells. Natural cells will run from 4.6mm to 5.1mm for worker brood. 4.9mm foundation with large cell bees will result in mostly 5.1mm the firs try and 4.9mm the second try.

    4.9mm is a much more natural size than 5.4m (standard foundation) but natural comb varies much more.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    953

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    Dear peggjam,
    One thing that I have really noticed in my own operation is that when you REALLY turn your attention to getting and maintaining a handle on your mite populations, the problem of mites become very easy to manage.
    In addressing my fellow beekeepers here in Oregon, I have a standard speach:
    "We have to be as good of mitekeepers as we are beekeepers".
    We have,for the forseeable future, two populations that we must continually manage in our hives: honeybees and varroa.
    The thing is, we are managing them in two different directions.
    We do everything to manage our honeybee populations for a peak population that matches the honeyflow. At the same time we are managing the varroa for the lowest population directly after.
    Mite control strategies are designed in the opposite direction of honeybee brood timing.
    Testing is the most important thing.
    First, test for varroa levels.
    Second, and this is the most important thing of the day we are in; test the efficacy of the treatment(s) that you use.
    As humans, we often respond to problems with "solutions" that do nothing more than make us feel better. However, they are total failures in resolving the problem.
    I am aware of at least two "mite treatments" that are talked about ad-nauseum that are a compleate waste of time and money as stated by our nation's finest authorities.
    But boy it sure feels like you are doing something!!!
    Testing is the answer. The proof is in the test results, not in how good the "treatmant"makes us feel.
    Check out www.mitegone.com and read about varification testing.
    This is very important regardless of the strategy employed.
    Harry
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Troupsburg, NY
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    Harry:

    Thank you for taking the time to address the topic in this thread. My entire idea here was to get mountains of relevent data into one thread so it was easy for new beekeepers to access this information, have it upto date, and in one spot, so there would be no need to do searches for information that was presented awhile ago, and could be outdated. So we have one new piece of information, that monitoring mite levels is important. Can we build on that with specfic treatments, procedures, and why this treatment works. Who knows, we might all learn something from everyones colletive expecerances(sp). Thanks.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Totnes, Devon, England
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    peggjam:

    The difference between 'small cell' and 'natural cell' is that the former is achieved by providing a specific small cell foundation, requiring the bees to build worker cell at that size, whereas natural cell means letting the bees build what size (and shape) they choose to build. If you look at natural comb, you will see that bees build a range of sizes varying according to their position and by the season.

    I'm only just re-starting my TBH/natural cell experiments after a year's break, so will report later on how successful I have been with mite control.

    Right now, the SW English spring is a stop/start affair - mostly cold, windy and wet.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
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    751

    Post

    More stop than start so far. The bees are doing OK, but there's no sign of my parsnips.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    >My entire idea here was to get mountains of relevent data into one thread so it was easy for new beekeepers to access this information, have it upto date, and in one spot,

    Perhaps a noble idea, but, one should think of this Biological Beekeeping Forum as such. And in as much a more organized index searchable by any catagory.

    >So we have one new piece of information, that monitoring mite levels is important.

    New? Hardly. Anyone dealing with mites for any time has had to monitor to know the condition of their bees and hive health. The problems that have arisen with wholesale treatments without monitoring is what hastened the the varroa's resistance to chemicals.

    Monitoring has been advocated since the late 90's (that I know of) when I started beekeeping.

    The 'search' tool on this forum is your friend, use it wisely.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >Varoa Screen Trap...I have heard that one can just spray the drawer with PAM or some other sooking spray the mites stick to the spray. I am told this will reduce mite populations by 40%.

    I would not count on that at all. If you get a 25% drop in Varroa population I would be surprised. Not that I don't like SBB, but I would not count on them to control the Varroa. The are useful for monitoring and useful for improving ventilation and useful for improving the effeciency of other methods such as powdered sugar or FGMO or even the chemical methods such as Apistan or Checkmite.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Troupsburg, NY
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    Bullseye Bill:

    New as in this thread. And I see no reason as to why we as a community couldn't get all the information on organic mite control into one thread that would answer alot of questions without endless searches and off-topic responses. So either add relevent information or don't bother to post.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    >So either add relevent information or don't bother to post.

    Oh, my!

    The problem to trying to put all information in one single thread is that it makes it too user unfriendly. That is the reason that Barry will not let any thread run over fifteen pages. Once the thread gets too long it is nearly impossible to find relivant posts through a search engine.

    Say if someone who wants to know a particular point on essential oils, they may have to wade through any number of pages in this thread when it could have been easily found in a one or two page thread about that single topic.

    In femineeze: When there is too much in your purse, it makes it too hard to find the lipstick.

    Another problem is that once this thread is over a few days old without any new posts it is lost in the back pages and would have to be found with a search anyway.

    BTW, telling me not to post is like peeing in the wind.

    My favorite post on treatments by MB:
    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...=000345#000012

    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...=000269#000001

    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...=000389#000005

    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...=000347#000001

    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...=002481#000001

    Hope it helps,
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
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    Sorry I ever advanced this idea, by the way your talking to the Jim end of peggjam, so your femineeze joke, while cute, is really irrelivent.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
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    >>In femineeze: When there is too much in your purse, it makes it too hard to find the lipstick.

    Ha ha! I wouldn't have dared say that....
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    So either add relevent information or don't bother to post.
    just because someone starts a thread doesn't authorize them to say what can be posted to it.

    Bill was thinking about trying some frozen candle experiments. With icy responses such as that he won't need a freezer! [img]tongue.gif[/img]

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Seattle
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    46

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    I am aware of at least two "mite treatments" that are talked about ad-nauseum that are a compleate waste of time and money as stated by our nation's finest authorities.
    But boy it sure feels like you are doing something!!!
    Harry,
    As a new beekeeper can you tell me which two methods your talking about?
    j

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