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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Moore County, NC
    Posts
    208

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    Mann Lake is now listing the propane smoker in their new catalog (pg 37), also known as the Younger smoker I believe. If you have used this, what is your opinion on its effectiveness? Not interested in a treatise on how cheap a traditional smoker and your favorite fuel are or how a real beekeeper only uses a traditional smoker; just interested in the effectiveness of this smoker. Thanks.

    [size="1"][ February 11, 2007, 04:39 PM: Message edited by: Sherpa1 ][/size]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    9,123

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    "Not interested in a treatise on how cheap a traditional smoker and your favorite fuel are or how a real beekeeper only uses a traditional smoker; just interested in the effectiveness of this smoker."

    If I had to wager, you're gonna hear it
    anyway.

    Do a search on the Younger and you'll get
    a bunch of info. Someone from Colorado I
    think bought one and commented on it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    {Not interested in a treatise on how cheap}

    Yea, I'm with Bruce. Imagine the whole world is about only what you are interested in and we're all here to answer the one question you have in the context you define instead of doing a thought provoking thread that serves everyone!

    Here's my "Treatise", although you may find it not within your context I hope it will spurn addtional comment.

    Haven't used one although in a commercial operation the efficiency of not having to be constantly be on the hunt for the next days' smoker fuel seems enticing. It would be nice on rainy days when hives have to be moved or worked despite the weather headache. I think it comprimises some of the art of this craft which most of us, even on a busy day with many hives to work, would find other shortcuts!

    [size="1"][ February 11, 2007, 06:05 PM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,952

    Post

    >>Younger smoker

    Ya, I am thinking about getting one. Not for everyday beekeeping work, because regular smokers work so cheap. But for quick in and out jobs, or where you only need the smoker for a clean up job in the yard. It would make my life a lot easier and make the job a lot more pleasant.
    Nothing is worse than trying to lite a dam smoker, just for a 3 min job, taking you 10 to get a good smoke, while giving up after 8 min of fighting the smoker, to get raped by the stinking stubborn hive that should have been blown out in the first place!
    The Younger smoker might save a lot of aggravation.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,952

    Post

    What are they worth?
    whats the smoke worth?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    Holy Cow, checked the catalog-not on Mann Lakes web site yet.

    Smoker $179.00
    Smoker
    Fluid $16.95 Qt.

    Takes a propane tank the size for a lantern and this thing looks like Rube Goldberg worked overtime designing it. It has a metal base over which the tank is mounted at an angle and what looks like something the size of an optimus stove mounted on the propane tank. Add to that a series of piping that you could make moonshine through and a little container to hold the smoke liquid. It weighs 4 pound b-4 the propane tank and the smoker fluid so must be about 6-7 lbs all said. It says it makes a simulated smoke plume (what's that mean!! You'd have $240 in it before the 1st light. It looks pretty formidable to wield.

    Much less expensive, for about 50 bucks you can, by a fogger and use FGMO with some thymol, and gain an advantage over mites without hauling around this contraption. I've used it many a day when I didn't want to deal with a short run at a yard or rain was an issue.

    Sherpa, if you get one let us know know what you find, it sure looks interesting!

    Where's Jim F, he's good friends with the owner, maybe he could call him and fill us in further!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Moore County, NC
    Posts
    208

    Post

    Joel,
    What do you think of using their "smoker fuel" in a burgess type fogger. I know they say "no" on their web site, but I may try it for myself since I already own a fogger. If FGMO does not frequently clog the fogger, I doubt if this glycerine and water based "smoker fuel" will. What do you think?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    I certainly would think it is worth a try. I took the rubber ring off the plunger on my fogger and it has worked much better as the FGMO is pretty viscous. I would imagine glycerine and water might be a little less but should still work. Let us know what you find out if you try it, the FGMO and Thymos masks alarm odors but sure does run disrupt things when used as a smoker as you may already be aware.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Camp County, Tx
    Posts
    94

    Post

    I gave up on my small smoker that is the general entry level thing that some folks end up getting. Get that bigest smoker from Dadant and use pine straw (long pine needles) just go where they fell on the ground and a rake them into a cardboard box and your set for a long time. This stuff lasts long and works great. I have run a few hives and set my smoker aside back at the shed and come back hours later and its still smoking. Sorry if this is not the answer you wanted, but hopefully someone will gain from it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Post

    Ian,
    I hate to say it, but it shouldn't take more than 3-4 minutes to get a really good smoke going if you are using the right fuel. I use burlap or sisal from old coffee sacks; lights fast, and after a few good puffs it burns at a slow smolder until you hit the bellows, at which point it gives good smoke. If you have a coffee distributor anywhere nearby, ask them for some sacks - especially the sisal.
    (Canadians do drink coffee, don't they?)

    Bruce, I guess you were right!!!!
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I darn near bought a Younger until I discovered
    the power of the propane torch,,,, [img]smile.gif[/img]

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,952

    Post

    >>Canadians do drink coffee, don't they?)

    Of course! What would we dunk our donuts in? [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Red Bluff, Ca
    Posts
    301

    Post

    Ian;

    I use a spray bottle with Wrights liquid smoke mixed with water. about 30cc to a quart of water. Some times you have to add more smoke. Never have to worry about a grass fire when everything is dry.
    Dan

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >I discovered the power of the propane torch

    That's a little hard on the bees ain't it?
    Dulcius ex asperis

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    Post

    "That's a little hard on the bees ain't it?"

    It takes a steady, sure hand George.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    >>I use burlap or sisal from old coffee sacks; lights fast, and after a few good puffs

    Now seriously,
    ya I use to use that all the time. But now I have quit. My workers tend to feel sick when using burlap and sisal for smoke, untreated yet. And I have just quit getting the stuff.
    I use alot of rolled up cardboard and hay and sutch.
    I am thinking of getting bulk wood pellets. They are quick and easy and give a good smelling smoke.
    Anyway,


    >>Wrights liquid smoke

    Say Ishi,

    I am not familiar with this stuff. Your saying you spray this stuff on the bees and it calms them as smoke does?
    Interesting,.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Post

    >My workers tend to feel sick when using burlap and sisal

    You mean your human workers, not the bees, right? That's interesting. I wonder why they feel that way with this particular kind of smoke? Are you sure it is untreated? The reason I ask is that the stuff I use is from an organic coffee company, and I am certain that it is untreated, food-grade stuff.

    >>Wrights liquid smoke

    Any residue left in the combs or honey?
    Next thing you know this stuff will be touted as the next cure for tracheal and varroa mites!
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Red Bluff, Ca
    Posts
    301

    Post

    Wrights liquid smoke Just liquid smoke from the grocery store.
    Do not use it on the honey supers.
    Local County bee guy uses it in the summer. He had a school spray it on the flowers around the school so that the bees would leave and the kids would not get stung.

    I never checked the comb but the bees are back on the comb in about 10 min.
    Dan

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
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    Post

    >>You mean your human workers

    yes, never looked into it too much. Carried potatoes, so , you would expect it to be untreated,.? The sizal likely was treated, I dont know of much that isnt. So I went from the used sizal to burlap, and now to cardboard.

    Not too much of a concern. If my work complains, what can I do about it, becasue I need them there to work. Cardboard works okay.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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