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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Kansas
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    183

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    I'm looking into what brand of flat white exterior latex paint is the BEST. I was wondering if anybody here is subscribed to Consumer Reports, could you look on Consumer Reports website and see if they have tested any exterior latex paints? Does anybody here have an opinion about what brand of exterior latex paint is the BEST? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Thaxton, Mississippi
    Posts
    458

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    My Opinion?? 1. Benjamin Moore
    2. Gliddon 3. Porter 4. Sherwin Williams.
    5. Wal-Mart also has a good paint.. & price.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    5,159

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    I always look for gloss or semi-gloss. Flat just does not weather as well as gloss.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,331

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    The best exterior paint is the paint you get for free at the re-cycling center.

    Put your money in good primer.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    948

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    Im sorry Michael but I have to disagree with you on this one, this time.
    I am extremely particular about the construction and materials of our equipment. It would be a shame to go to all of that effort and then in the final step trim a few pennies on one of the most critical aspects; weatherization.
    Heres' my method:
    We shop for the best woodenware. Tight joints, few knotts, zero defects. Then we glue and crossnail the boxes in a box press.
    The boxes are then primed and painted with the best stuff you can get your hands on.
    And I agree with Bullseye; we use semigloss on the boxes and GLOSS on the lids and bottom boards. Years later you can hose them off and they look like new. Forget flat.
    Anyway, last year we used Olympic semigloss which turned out fine if you didn't mind 3 or 4 coats. Not enough solids for my taste.
    This year we are trying Behr. Goes on like yogert but one or two coats and you're good to go.
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

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    I'm with Harry here, only the best paint I
    can get goes on my boxes. The cost of paint
    is so small compared with replacing or having
    to repaint the box is just a couple years.

    And as Bill said, semi gloss only.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,332

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    Consumer Reports is really high on Glidden Spread-Dura or Endurance Semi-Gloss with the exception of the Glidden Evermore which is rated last. Behr is in the middle of the ratings Benjamin Moore near the bottom. I would also agree to stay away from a flat (dosen't clean well) or Gloss on the boxes (too slick to handle and not easily painted over in the future) and stay with a satin or semi-gloss. And definately follow all priming instructions. Personally we buy a BPS paint at a farm supply store which can also be used as a primer by slightly thinning and have had excellant results with it for about $80 a 5 gallon can.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Madisonville, Texas
    Posts
    438

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    PPG has some of the best paints. They last longer then most and resist mildew better then most.
    ;) Good Day Craig W.<br /><a href=\"http://www.weaversproduce.mysite.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.weaversproduce.mysite.com</a>

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sparkill, NY
    Posts
    110

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    Well, if you are interested in the best (have to admit I too go a little overboard in this department) try looking at the ECO paints from Holland. I use this paint and like it a lot. You can check them out here:
    http://www.finepaintsofeurope.com/eco_info.aspx

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Omaha Ne
    Posts
    80

    Post

    SEARS WEATHER BEATER We buy it off the return shelf. $25.00 a gallon stuff for $3 bucks. We mix 2 to 5 gallons together at a time. Oh man is it pretty. I asked my bees if it was ok with them if we did not use white & they told me it's fine with them.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,136

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    I have a question. Is it a problem to paint a semi-gloss latex over a flat latex? It's just that all my boxes are flat exterior latex.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Magnolia, NJ
    Posts
    42

    Post

    Finneran & Haley primer and exterior latex in high gloss is all I use. It's pricey but lasts far longer than any other paint I've ever come across.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

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    I'm sold on any paint Consumer Reports runs
    tests on. Their tests are real life and
    extensive. And they are beholding to none
    of the manufacturers. Like jlyon has pointed
    out, Glidden Spread Dura out performs many
    of the more expensive brands.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    183

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    (Consumer Reports Exterior Paint Ratings)

    http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/h...rior/index.htm

    [size="1"][ January 29, 2007, 05:34 PM: Message edited by: betrbekepn ][/size]

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Tigard, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Exterior Latex Paint (Consumer Reports)?

    Think of paint as a system. Primer should be latex flat or alkyd (oil) flat. [Think of primer as a stickleburr. It can grasp both the wood of your hive and the next coat of paint. Gloss looks like a marble.] Topcoat should be latex and should have slight sheen, no more than semi-gloss. It is preferable to use satin, eggshell, or whatever the manufacturer calls a low-gloss paint. Don't topcoat with either flat or higher than semi-gloss--you have to prime over gloss before you can repaint.

    Get your paint from the mis-tints pile or similar. Use flat latex paint = primer. Color is no matter, you plan to cover it up anyway, but lighter is better. Stack your hive bodies in a carefully placed stack (like a stone mason would do it). Apply primer/paint with 1/2" nap roller and stroke out with a decent latex paint brush. It is okay to mix brands or paint sheens (flat/eggshell, etc.). I prefer lighter to white. Work with latex for easy clean-up.

    The above is a mixture of my years in the painting and coatings industry and even more in beekeeping pursuits.

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