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  1. #1

    Post

    I have access to alot of plywood and osb scrap sheeting. Do these wood products contain chemicals in them that are harmful to bees, or can they be used to build various hive components?
    Bryant

  2. #2

    Post

    I have used plywood for making inner covers, telescoping covers, screened bottom boards, and double screened boards. I have not made supers or hive bodies but have seen plans and have read in the forum of folks making boxes out of ply and there are some discussions of using pressure treated material. Try a search of the forum and read, read, read.

    Good luck,

    Pete0
    Bena, VA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,531

    Post

    I use plywood for inner covers tops & bottom boards and have used OSB for tops=no problems.

    Mostly I use what is in the dumpster
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    OSB is a poor choice for hives IMO. The
    plywood is another thing. Good stuff but
    not for boxes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Harriman, Tn
    Posts
    175

    Post

    I use ply wood in my nuc box's I end up with about 6 bucks in a 3/4" nuc

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Good idea LB...... I think Nuc's would be
    a good use for the plywood as well. It will
    not see the weather a standard box would and
    will probably last a good long while.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    About 95% of my supers are made of 3/4 inch plywood, some are years old and are still in great shape. They are heaver by three pounds for a deep, but I can make 10 deeps and 2 mediums out of two 4X8 sheets. The latest prices for plywood in my area is $17.95 that brings the cost to around $ 3.50 per box. As long as you prime and paint them they will give you many years of useful life. I don’t really know how long they will last as I have never had one rot out yet, and some of them have been in continuos use for seven years.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Newton, Pa.
    Posts
    915

    Post

    I make all of my boxes out of 3/4 inch plywood. You can get 10 shallow supers or 6 deep hive bodies out of each sheet. With the cost of plywood in my area I can make the supers for about $2.00 apiece. The hive bodies for a little under $3.50.

    I also make my 5 frame nucs out of 3/8 inch plywood. I can make 4 complete nucs out of one full sheet of plywood. That includes the bottom and telescoping top. It cost me about $3.25 per nuc.

    I honestly can't say how long they will last since I've only been making them out of plywood for the last 3 years. So far they're holding up well with one coat of primer and two coats of exterior mismatched paint ($5.00/gallon).

    My experience with osb is that if there is any chance at all that it will be exposed to moisture, it's best not to use it. I think that there is too much moisture in a bee hive therefore I've never tried the osb in any capacity in my hives. Once the osb absorbs the slightest moisture it swells and usualy becomes unusable. I suppose if you had a good coat of paint or preservative on it the moisture would have a hard time penetrating. The only problem is, everything you read says not to use paint inside a hive. Because of these concerns I haven't tried the osb for anything related to my hives.
    Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Guatemala
    Posts
    243

    Post

    I am completely sure none of the chemicals used in bonding the plywood or OSB will drift into honey and turn it unsafe. Nor will bees suffer from short breath or become dizzy from the toxic fumes... but ask an organic certifier and he´ll tell you a different opinion.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Romney Marsh Kent England UK
    Posts
    292

    Post

    My first hive and superI bought was made from cedar wood,
    I took the measurements from these and made all my supers and brood boxes from ¾ inch ply 8x4 foot sheets,
    If your going to do it on the cheap then make sure you use a good water proof glue and
    Give plenty of coats of bee friendly wood preserver,

    I think cheap is the only way to go. [img]smile.gif[/img]


    Tony

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Eastwood, Notts, UK
    Posts
    4

    Post

    Hi

    I have been playing with the idea of using plywood to make deeps and shallow and will give it a go now that i have seen some positive opinions on the subject. On detail, are there prefered types of plywood and some types which are a bad idea?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    399

    Post

    How do you make joints in a 3/8 inch ply? I mean what type of joints? Any pics? I like to experiment.. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Thanks
    There is no greater satisfaction than the satisfaction of a job well done.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Eastwood, Notts, UK
    Posts
    4

    Post

    I was going to make a national hive using the conventional joints i.e. a dado joint to connect the sides to the ends but I am unsure whether a grove near the edge will be strong enough. I was thinking of using a dado joint with dowel pegs for added strength. Any thoughts are welcome.

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