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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    I use the crown stapler too. yes the nice thing is the different ranges it takes. Here is a good one - uses a range from 3/8" to 1 1/2".

    Nice thing about the crown staple is you have 2 metal pins rather than a single nail, connected at the top by the "crown".

    Grizzly 18 ga. crown stapler - $29.95

    I have a different one but basically the same.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Newton, Pa.
    Posts
    915

    Post

    When putting frames together I use two brad nailers. I have one set up with 18 ga. x 1-1/4" long brads that I use to nail the top bar to the end bars and the end bars to the bottom bars (divided bottom bars). I have the other stapler set up with 18 ga. x 5/8" brads to fasten in the wedge bar for the foundation. This way I don't have to bother changing different size brads back and forth.

    I also use the 1-1/4" brads to tack my hive bodies together once I glue them. These hold the boxes aligned together until I get the 1-1/4" drywall screws all run in.
    Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hanson, MA
    Posts
    70

    Post

    Carbide, 1-1/4 drywall screws? What a novel idea. Bet they hold better than the nails do. Seems like everybody here uses air nailers and not electric ones. Hope I don't have problems down the road.
    Greg, originally from Maine

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Red Bluff, Ca
    Posts
    301

    Post

    I use 2" drywall screws 1 5/8 if I am out of 2". If you break out the rabbit on the top of the super just take out enough screws to clear the saw, cut off the top 1 1/2 " and make a new pice.
    Dan

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    The deck screws are the best. I just don't always have time to mess with them. They work best with a pilot hole and drilling all the pilot holes and then screwing in all the screws is a lot of work. But it pays off. I prefer 2" for the corners but at least 1 1/2". I like the 1 1/4" for putting cleats on (except the corners) where you don't want the screw to stick out when putting it through two 3/4" boards.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    I use an air nailer. But if I was going to get into the screwing game I would look at the power screwdrivers the deck builders use.

    Senco Automatic Feed Screwdriver

    Great excuse for a new tool!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Newton, Pa.
    Posts
    915

    Post

    [QUOTE] Great excuse for a new tool!

    Judging from your past comments, it didn't appear that you needed any excuse.
    Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken!

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    I split frames trying to nail them together on a regular basis, I rarely do using an 18 gauge brad nailer they are a great thing for beekeeping probably rate right up there with the movable frame bee hive.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >I split frames trying to nail them together on a regular basis

    Wrong wood, or wrong technology for the available wood. If the nailer works, I suppose you're all set. I'll get a crown stapler when I run out of 1.25" wire nails, in about 5 years [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Dulcius ex asperis

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    the nice thing about a brad nailer is it sinks the head so you don't see it
    of course this doesn't much matter in a beehive
    I can easily see how a staple is stronger which is what we're after
    they're pretty cheap, I see one in my future [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Dave

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Red Bluff, Ca
    Posts
    301

    Post

    David

    I have a drywall screw gun 2500rpm it will twist off a #6 screw down in the wood then the tops will warp.
    Dan

  12. #32
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >the nice thing about a brad nailer is it sinks the head so you don't see it

    Oh! Those unsightly nail heads!
    Dulcius ex asperis

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Thornton Colorado
    Posts
    2,003

    Post

    If you use glue, and you should, and you do it right so you don't have a glue starved joint, then the difference between a stapler and a brad nailer is nil. You are only using them to hold the frame together until the glue sets.

    In the woodworking world, brads aren't used except in places where you are tacking things in place as they are consider to have no strength so when the joint strength comes from a fastener the woodworker will use at least a fastener of the finish nail size. I do not know the area of contact of the staples but suspect that it comes close to the that of a finish nail and if you were only using fasteners then it no doubt beats a brad.

    But a good glue joint makes either unnecessary.

    Now the joint most likey to go bad on these is the joint between the sides and the top as it includes a fair amount of end grain. (bottom of dado on end bars and shoulders on top bars) You should butter the end bar end grain and let it sit for a bit then add glue again when assembling.

    Mine, from Kelly's, are tight enough that they don't need a clamp. Here is how I do it:

    .Hold the end bars so that I can butter the end grain.
    .stick the endbars in the jig upside down and glue the bottom bars on.
    .flip the jig over.
    .Put glue on the topbars and pop them on.

    Sometime I assemble 10 while I really doing something else so I just leave them in the jig until the glue sets. For these I'm done. Othertimes I will be assembling a bunch so I have to move them out of the jig wet. For those I drive a brad down into the end bar from above so they will stay together while I jostle them around.

    This is with titebond II. If you use gorilla glue (or any PU glue) then you must somehow maintain clamping pressure or the glue will foam your work apart.
    JohnF INTP

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hanson, MA
    Posts
    70

    Quick update on my brad nailer.

    Ann and I ended up taking the "Task Force" brad nailer back to Lowe's today because it didn't have enough power to drive the brads home. We ended up buying a Hitachi 2" pneumatic that should have more than enough power. It'll also take the smaller 5/8" brads that we can use for installing foundation. Between the new air gun and the jig I bought the 350 frames I have to do will go alot quicker and smoother. Thanks for the input everybody.
    Greg, originally from Maine

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