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Thread: Used skid-steer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    san antonio.texas USA
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    I was hopeing yall could help me with my homework on skid-steers. I want to purchase a used skid-steer later this year and need recommendations on minimum engine size, lift capacity, maximum number of hours, brand etc. Loader will move 50 4 way pallets a few times per year. I understand 5th wheels and mast are nice. I have driven and like swingers, but they are out of my price range. Thanks for you help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    College Station, Texas
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    I do suspect than just about any model would suit your needs. I would suggest that if you are using it infrequently that a diesel model would be a good choice simply because the fuel will not deteriorate while the machine just sets. like automobile and lots of machinery a great deal is told by the nature of the prior owner.

  3. #3
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    Jun 2004
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    Clayton Indiana
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    Take a good look at Kabota. Around here they are well serviced and lots of them. They have handy small scale diesel tractors that might fit the need.
    Todd Zeiner

  4. #4
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    [size="1"][ February 28, 2006, 12:27 PM: Message edited by: sqkcrk ][/size]
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  5. #5
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    Apr 2005
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    Omaha, NE
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    I have 97 763 I bought 3 years ago with a pallet fork attachment & digger teeth with the bucket. Machine had under 800 hours on it & was in really nice shape I had to give 13K for it. No tail wheel or mast on it it serve my needs just fine. Plus a guy can do a little dirt around the building or out in the bee yards, or push snow in the winter. For the money a guy can't go wrong they are a whole lot cheaper than used swingers.

    [size="1"][ February 20, 2006, 09:18 AM: Message edited by: Brian Suchan ][/size]
    AKA BEEMAN800

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    New Holland makes a great skidder. They have a unique lift system on the loader, check one of them out when looking around.

    >>engine size, lift capacity, maximum number of hours, brand etc. Loader will move 50 4 way pallets a few times per year.

    4 way pallets, lets say doubles fully fed for a Canadian winter, will weigh near 800lbs, give or take a hundred lbs or so. So dont buy the smallest available capable of lifting 600 lbs. Look for a slightly larger modle to lift over 1000 lbs. You dont want to be pushing the limit, for the machine will tip forwards if overloaded, then you are **** out of luck to move the pallet. Also think of other uses within your operation. I load and unload pallets of honey from the beeyard to the trailer and then into the hot room. On a good flow, I stack 16 per pallet, at 60lbs gross per box the weight is already reaching 1000lbs.
    Also you might want to start moving and or stacking barrels. You might as well for you have the machine. They are 660lbs gross. Lift the barrel four feet to stack and your 600lbs capacity skidder will tip forwards.
    I suggest the larger 1200-2200 lbs models, although they are a bit heavier and little bit larger to manuver.

    You will wounder how you managed without one once you get it!!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #7
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    Jul 2005
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    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    i'd consider a compact utility tractor, like a john deere 790 with a loader. You can put pallet forks on the loader, move dirt, plus you have a PTO and rear 3 pt hitch.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
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    I tried and still own a 790 John Deere tractor. Its lifting ability is only 800 pounds. I was using 4 way pallets and most times it would not lift the pallets. It is still a great tractor but not for beekeeping. I ended up with a Bobcat 763 disel and it is the best thing I ever got for bee loading and unloading.

    Clint
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  9. #9
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    Jul 2005
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    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    wow - what lift capacity would be the minimum desirable?

  10. #10
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    May 2002
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    San Mateo, CA
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    I just spent two days on a moist slope prepping soil with my new track Bobcat T190. After 25 years on bobcats with tires a track machine sure is the way to go if you're on dirt.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
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    lets see: Your bees get a bumper crop of 200 lbs of honey on 4 hives on the palett. Thats 800 pounds, How much do the hive bodies and frames weigh alone? How much does the palett weigh, How high are you lifting, How rough is the place where you set,pick up the hives, and are you also going to use it to move honey suppers around, (how many at a time.) It is cheeper to go too large than to need to replace it with a larger machine.
    What I am saying is to think ahead and plan before you make that first purchase.
    I never had the extra wheel or mast but I did have a good nut behind the wheel.
    Clint
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    I too am in the market for a Bobcat but have no knowledge of what to check out mechanically.

    What is a quick checklist of things to inspect to insure a decent machine?

    Thanks

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
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    I have used a 643 to load bees before. I just bought a 743 Bobcat(1240 lbs lift) with removeable tracks and fork attachment and digger teeth bucket. It has the Kubota diesel engine. Things to look for: good tires, make sure the control sticks aren't flopping around and the machine goes backward and forward with no major noise, shuddering, vibration,slippage. Mine tneds to want to drift to the right when going forward and it has a little pump noise. Make sure the lift arms go all the way up and odwn smoothly and the bucket tilts both ways smoothly and the control pedals are responsive equally. You want smooth operation, 'cause it doesn't take much to bounce a load of bees off the forks.

    The newer models have gone to a New Holland style lifting arrangement, which keeps the load closer to the machine and is more stable.

    These things can and will hurt you if you don't keep your brain engaged while operating.
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

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