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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Lightbulb

    I know we have kicked around trailers before but bear with me.

    I have an idea rattling around in my head. I am sure it is being done as I saw a 2 story trailer before.

    My colonies are on, and will be on only on 4 way pallets.

    I was thinking of a trailer that is 4 parallel rails, wide enough and long enough, to support 4 each 4 way pallets with a 2 foot wide board walk down the middle.

    Pallets would be arranged lengthwise to keep the trailer as narrow as possible. There would be 3 each 16 inch wide walks at right angles to the central board walk between pallet 1 & 2, 2 & 3, and 3 & 4.

    Bed length: 18.0 feet
    Bed width: 7.5 feet
    Over all lenth: 24 feet
    2" ball coupler
    Single 2000# axle - torsion
    14" wheel/tires


    Keep in mind that they would be transported without supers so the weight to be hauled would likely not exceed 1600#.

    When parked the bed ends would be supported by crank down RV jacks at all 4 corners.

    How wonderful to hook on and follow the flow. Also easy to move to interupt SHB life cycle.

    How spendy if you build it yourself (new steel)?

    Any ideas and modifications??

    Any software out there to design such a beast.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Hi Bruce,
    Oh, yes, there is wonderful software to design it. The best being Solidworks. You picked a bad time to build, however. The price of steel has skyrocketed.
    Wheels and axles can be had from old pickup trucks. The ones they used around here were farm wagons, but they didn't use pallets. I think your idea is better.
    It's been a while since I've looked at one, but as I recall, they used a 4" center pipe for transfering pull between the front and rear axles. I have one down in my lower field. I'll take a trip down there and send you a picture and drawing.
    Jon
    Jon, N6VC/5

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Cool.......

    I hear you on steel. Being in the garage door biz I see the hits regularly, especially spring steel.

    If I could afford aluminium I would go with that. But I am a hacker at welding aluminimum!! I'd have to farm that out.

    I was thinking about having the outer rails bend so they would converge at the hitch. And the 2 inner rails would tack in at the outer angled part.

    There would be steel cross boxes down the line.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
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    Post

    Forgot to ask......... Where do you get Solidworks?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    The Solidworks Personal Edition should be a free program. It is good for 60 days. There is a good onboard tutorial. Get the basics and go from there.
    It is possible to get extensions on this.
    http://www.solidworks.com/pages/news/3DSkills.html
    If your company uses Solidworks, you can get a free home edition through them.
    Jon
    Jon, N6VC/5

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Bruce,
    I was thinking of a full trailer, not a semi-trailer. In that case, you should be able to buy tandem axles at a trailer manufacturing company. We have several of them around here and the guys are always making some odds and ends of stuff.
    Doing a semi-trailer would also let you go lower. I've worked bees on a farm trailer (full trailer) and they need to be high enough to clear the steering axle.
    Jon
    Jon, N6VC/5

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Bruce, I don't know how it is out there, but around here old mobile homes are going for free or less. It costs $300.00 to have one towed to the dump, and the dump charges $500.00 to accept it. People here are glad to find someone to take them for free. Maybe you will want to talk to some of the mobile home dealers in your area.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    I attended a seminar at ABF-Norfolk 1997 where a couple of pollinators in Delaware used old mobile home frames with trailers. Said there were a little sketchy at highway speeds but you were hard pressed to overload them. I like the low to the ground type with a ramp as Hate lifting hives onto a trailer! Pallets are good if you can haul a fork lift. Sundance your trailer sound good. A couple of item I would add is electric brakes to one axle and some type of retractable bear fence set up in case you had to leave them parked in bear country over night.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    The trailer I have in mind is single axle mind you as it will not haul any more than 16 colonies. Or 1600# roughly.

    Honey supering is only done with the RV crank down jacks extended on all corners.

    No deck as the pallets will attach directly to the rails. I will load via forklift.

    I want a light weight trailer that can be pulled with a little Toyota truck.

    I want the ability to more to flows easily.

    Small is beautiful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
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    Post

    The weight you speak of should be no problem for the vehicle brakes. I pictured you hauling the forklift too. My prediction though (only because of my own experiance) is in 5 years it will be 50 or a 100 hives. I started with a 5 X 10. Small is beautiful, at that size they tow so nicely and don't bog you down quickly when you get off the pavement.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,795

    Post

    I would go full weight bearing capacity with brakes so that you can haul the trailer back to the extracting house without taking the supers off, and buy a heavier truck, which you will need anyways if you pull the full supers and load them on your truck. 16 X 150 lbs. = 2400lb. If you haul the trailer back to the extracting room to remove them you will save lifting 2400 lbs. several times. Off the hive, onto the truck, onto the pile, off the truck etc.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I hear you Joel. I already have a double axle 7x18, and a single axle 6x12 and a couple little guys to boot.

    The idea is to move... I am working on nice out yards for next year as my 32 is the max I want near the home.

    Outyards have nice CRP as well as crops, there I will plant 30 to 40 colonies for most the season.

    Small trailers are more to get to nice varital honeys and stay on clover.

    In 3 years I hope to have my own 48' flatbed and tractor.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Good idea Oliver. An extra 1500# axle would do the trick.

    Even at 3000# my Toyota can handle it. I haul a beavy ol' ditch witch with it and it weigns in at close to 4000#

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Post

    iddee adds:
    Bruce, I don't know how it is out there, but around here old mobile homes are going for free or less. It costs $300.00 to have one towed to the dump, and the dump charges $500.00 to accept it. People here are glad to find someone to take them for free. Maybe you will want to talk to some of the mobile home dealers in your area.

    tecumseh replies:
    the rims on a house trailer are often referred to as slip rims. the tires that are typically mounted on these rims are considered to be 'temporary' tires and should never be used for long transport. you can (i have) modify these trailer axles by changing out to 15" six hole hubs and rims. these house trailer spindles are exacly the same as a 5000# axle. you have to acquire two hubs and two sets of bearings to make the conversion. normally at least one axle on an old trailer is equipped with electric brakes. brakes are essential. always design your trailer to hold a minimum of twice the anticipated load.

    if you think you might utilize house trailer axle, drop me a line and I will look up in my trailer supple catalog (Trailer Supply) the appropriate bearing that you would need to make the conversion.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I would be more than happy to utilize mobile home trailer axles. But not willing to drag the whole pile to my place!! I have enought crap here already. [img]smile.gif[/img] .

    Maybe these dumps where they land would sell the axles cheap??

    Thanks for the offer tecumseh, I will let you know.

    After thinking about hauling the whole trailer back for super removal I have nixed that idea. I will have a forklift and super removal will not be an issue.

    All future yards will not be too far away. Most will be off dirt roads and the trailers will hardly ever see blacktop.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    All of my hive trailers are rebuilds of used mobile homes. Each is a two axle trailer with space for 20 hives and a tool box with jack, spare tires (2), bee stuff, etc.

    When I set the trailer down on fairly flat ground the rear of the trailer is within 1 inch of truck tailgate height...I work the hives from the truck...no up and down with full supers.

    The reg axles, hubs, and wheels are fine. First, you probably will not be going longer distances than they are designed for...trailers are often delivered 500-1000 miles...and a complete mobile home weighs far more than 20 hives/supers.

    BubbaBob

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    BB..... Do your trailers tend to veer right?

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    HAHAHA Ha Ha Ha HA - Now that's funny!
    Good one Bruce!

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Hey, guys, mine and bubba's trailers always veer right, that's why we try to always put the brakes on the left. [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img]

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    Dang...iddee beat me to it.

    BubbaBob

    PS...at least I don't wet the bed...LOL

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