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Thread: Hive lifts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Question

    Hi, about a year ago I saw some photos and some discussion on carts that lifted hive boxes and had wheels. I think that one of them was fabricated in Sweden. I am looking for some ideas on this equipment but can not find it. Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,267

    Post

    I believe I posted the link for the cart that would roll right into the back of a pickup truck. It was a Swedish web site about beekeeping in I believe the Chec Republic. I did a search using my Id but the search is only returning threads in 2005. I think I did the post back in November of 2004.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Post

    Thanks magnet-man, I will keep the thought in mind and do some more research. I am just a hobby bee-keeper who is getting older. I had a metal cattle gate float down our creek and so I have a bunch of metal to transform into something usable. All four of our hives are sitting on 18" steel pipe stands that were formerly a basketball court. The single pipe works beautiful as I put a strip of sticky stuff around the middle of the pipe and the ants are history, hopefully any other critters are also dicouraged by this method.Thanks again, Alex in KY

  4. #4

    Post

    I intend to make a lift carrier from the deck of an old push mower. I did a test with about 80 lbs. on it and it seemed to move quite well under the load. Once I remove the engine and then weld up some angle iron to hold the hive I'll report back.
    Bryn<br />bryn@ald.net<br /><br />\"I want to be oncommon\" -Pip, Great Expectations

  5. #5

    Post

    Have you checked Mann Lake catalog?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Post

    Hi, well I am still tossing around ideas on this subject. Right now I am thinking on fabricating something that will look like an engine lift that mounts with clevis pins on the front of my heavy lawn tractor. The problem still is the operation while guiding the boxes on and off. Maybe a winch with remote buttons running off a battery. The cart that I saw had a unique feature that pulled the boxes to a vertical frame on an angle. The angle was part of the lifting force. The other challenge is how do you attach to the box and hold it. Right now I am thinking of something with carpenters pipe clamps. Oh, well, hopefully I come up with something before the back gives out. Take care and have fun....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    582

    Post

    I have on occasion toyed with the idea of making a hive hoist that would attach to the front end of my David Bradley walk behind. Not sure of any of the details yet but want to be able to load hives on the back of my pick-up truck. ..Rick
    Turn stumbling blocks into stepping stones

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Post

    Hi, well, here I am soaked in perspiration as I just checked the hives and it is over 90F.
    Yesterday was the same but I finished welding and assembling my brain storm. The lawn tractor, it's and old Simplicity, has now a hydraulic lift in front courtesy of some scrap steel and Harbor Freight. So far I have not lifted any deep supers, that is the reason for the effort, but the whole thing looks promising. I just don't know yet how to load pictures to this board but once I learn I will try it. The thing that I like the most is the clamping device that is made with two pipe clamps and a fabricated "Lifting Beam".
    Take care and have fun.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Raymond, Mississippi, USA
    Posts
    184

    Post

    I for one am looking forward to seeing your pics.... I also have been brainstorming for quite a while on the best way to make a lifting device. I have had several ideas, but really no time to do the trial and error testing to find what works best.... anyway, looking forward to seeing your creativity..
    Thanx

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Hi

    You have to put the pix on a photo album service & post the link. I use photobucket.com It's free.

    Lew

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Post

    Hi Lew, thanks for the tip. I put the photo on the photobucket service. See what you all think.
    http://photobucket.com/albums/a297/Habedere
    look for Beetractor. Take care and have fun.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    interesting!!!!!!!

    Lew

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
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    1,848

    Post

    Looks like it might work Alex, I made a two man manual hive lifter like in the bee catalogs and you got me thinking about mounting something like yours on my gravely. Way to go!!
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
    Posts
    1,302

    Post

    I'm going to fabricate a hydraulic hoist to fit in a receiver hitch. It would mount at the edge of the truck bed and be able to swing at least 270 degrees. I could then move it from pickup to flatbed to trailer just by welding a receiver in the appropraite place.
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

  15. #15

    Post

    That tractor ppic looked like it took some work and money. So you take your tractor out, clamp the equipment on, pump up the lift, move the tractor and repeat? Sounds like easy on the back but a lot of work. What about a tall heavy hive?

    May I repeat myself? Have you looked at the Mann Lake catalog? Look for the loader. http://www.mannlakeltd.com/catalog/page73.htm
    beegee--&gt; I have this item if you want to try it out. I have made some adaptation per MB prior experience to allow me to lift tall stacks.

    How about the WTK loader they sell with or without a trailer? Might be a good place to start from if you are a DIYer.

    If your ideas already take 2 people to operate, a welding shop can make you an easy loader for less than $100. I'll sell mine for less than that also. It just means you have to add a strip of wood on the side of each hive.

    I like the ingenuity but find it impractical.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,082

    Post

    Make sure you have enough weight at the rear to offset whatever your going to pick up. I would hate to see you pick up a hive and have the rear end of the tractor lose enough traction that you can't go anywhere with the load off the ground. Neat idea though.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Alex,
    The problem you need to address is the distribution of weight in the hive (honey). You're assuming it will be balanced. Rest assured, it won't be.
    Remove the pony clamps and make a cross with half lap joints. This will form your strongback. Attach angle iron hooks that will fit in the finger holes and grip tighter when weight is applied. This will keep the hive level.
    You need to be able to swivel the load slightly to move it to the side.
    Here's another way to do it without the tractor. Use some strap steel on edge to form a track. Use pressure treated two by fours for ties. Dado a pair of grooves in the 2X4s to hold the strap steel in gauge and vertical. Run this track behind your hives. Construct a cart to mount your hoist on and you can move your hives where you want.
    The next step is to extend your track to the honey house and add a 1' gauge locomotive to pull it with. These are available as do-it-yourself, kits, or ready to run.
    My son and I plan to build a hand cart to provide motive power.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Post

    Hi, thanks for all the nice comments on the lift. Of course, the proof is in the pudding. The tractor weight has been tested and I still have the scar above my right ankle. Some years ago I turne the thing over and it took two guys to lift it off my leg. As to cost, well that is subjective. The lift itself was about 60 dollars, the steel was under 20 and I did all the welding myself, you see, I am retired and TV bores me. The lift does turn 360 degrees, it even has a grease fitting on the top. The boom extends for another two feet so I can get close enough if I have to. The clamps I don't think will give any problems as the center part where the chain attaches actually grabs into the hand-holds, and I have several different types. I really don't want it to balance perfectly to I can Inspect at times without lifting the whole thing off. It also enables me to smoke the bees out from under as it comes down. The hydraulic lift has a rather long control tube but if it needs more it can be made longer or eventually the whole thing can be updated with an inexpensive electric winch with the control right there at hand. Yes I did look at what Mann Lake has and it is good stuff, however, part of the whole exercise for me is the challenge. At present, the only draw-back that I see is that I will have to run a couple of rods or similar to transfer some of the pulling force to the back of the tractor. Right now, the whole thing is held on by three bolts and removal and attachment takes about two minutes. The bolts might me replaces eventually with clevis pins and then the whole thing is faster yet. The tractor has to do many different jobs. There might even be a pressure washer hook-up to the front of the engine as well. For me all this is fun and if someone can use my ideas and I can ease my efforts then it is all worth it.
    Take care and have fun.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Alex,
    If you are going to swivel it, you might think about outriggers to stabilize the weight.
    I didn't realize the cherry picker you bought swiveled. I will have to check it out.
    Thanks for the wonderful idea and pictures.
    The only thing I don't like about the whole design is the pony clamps.
    You have a good point about needing to tip the hive.
    Bee Culture had a system for handicapped beekeepers that was pretty slick. I donÂ’t remember the issue.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Post

    Hi Jon et al, the pony clamps are just something that I came up with for several reasons. First I can use them on woodworking projects as well, second the pressure is in line with the grain of the sides with minimal damage, third, the extension on the ends can be used as hand-holds for lifting if someone is helping me. I don't think that they will slip, even with considerable weight. If I ever decide to lift more than one box at a time I will change the length of the chains, possibly weld a hook on the ends of the spreader bar adjustments. I did look at the Mann Lake cart. It is a wonderful item, however, my philosophy does not let me put the hives on the ground. I might load another picture of my hives and you will see what I mean. Like I said, I am strictly a hobbyist and i like to tinker but we can also contribute some ideas to the commercial end of beekeeping. Tkae care and have fun.

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