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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
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    2,267

    Question

    Hey does anyone have an idea on how they make the metal foundation mill rollers now? Root says how they did it in the 1800Â’s, and I have seen lots of patents on how to make the rollers. If these patents were actually feasible, I donÂ’t know. I would assume that a cnc mill might be used.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Clayton Indiana
    Posts
    348

    Post

    CNC mill would be my guess. It is very easy to do the cad work and get the mill to do the work. Not cheap by any means. I had 14 years in Tool and Die prior to beekeeping. I'm not sure on the patents. Maybe Jim F can answer that one.
    Todd Zeiner

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,082

    Post

    From what I have read the rollers are actually tin embossed with the cell design and then welded(?) onto steel rollers, one on top roller, and one on the bottom roller.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
    Posts
    1,302

    Post

    Imagine how much fun you could have by hand-carving hexagonal cell patterns in a couple of wooden rolling-pins on cold winter evenings?....I think the CNC, a CAD program and a laser or water-jet would be the way to go. You could make the cells any size you wanted. It wouldn't be cheap, I don't think.
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

  5. #5

    Post

    I have a mill from tom's industries and for the money you will spend trying to make it you will come out cheaper buying it. he sells for $800.00 shipped to you. I have one Don

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    Does he have small cell mills? If he does........ do you have a contact email or phone #?

  7. #7

    Post

    yes he has small cell mills=that's what I got from him
    Tom's industries=P.O. box 26001 Yuma AZ.

    Don

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,267

    Post

    I am not trying to make one. It is an academic question only.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,267

    Post

    I am not trying to make one. It is an academic question only.

    A.I. RootÂ’s machine chiseled three flakes out of the roller and then stamped the indentation, If I remember his description correctly.

    One patent I have on my CD has the individual cells cut on top of a metal rod. The rods are inserted into holes in a hollow cylinder. The cylinder is then filled with a chemical that causes the rods to rust and thus seize in place. If the drum surface was damaged, the rod could be removed with some effort. I donÂ’t know if this method of making rollers was ever used though.

    Does anyone have one of Tom's Industries mills?
    is peggjam's description correct?

    From what I have read the rollers are actually tin embossed with the cell design and then welded(?) onto steel rollers
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    The Wooster Ohio bee museum has at least one, if
    not several machines that made such rollers.

    They looked to me that they could be oiled a
    bit and returned to working condition.

    These days, the roller would be made by a
    CNC machine, as it is a classic "step and
    repeat" pattern.

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