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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    N. Cent. KY
    Posts
    1

    Question

    Hey, I'm getting started. Got 3 swarms on the way. all my stuff is about ready. I got these real nice pine Hive top feeders from brushy Mountain. If I feed from the bare wood inside these, it'll get all cruddy. I used Helmsman on the outside, cause I liked the natural look of the wood. can I use this stuff on the inside without hurting the bees? Or maybe a clear epoxy, like that which Hyclas Paints make? Dont want to hurt the bees, you know......

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    261

    Post

    I would use a polyurethane and do it about three coats and let it air out for a week or so before use. That's how I do all mine (I run top feeders on regular hives AND nucs).
    Central IL... where there are more hogs than people and more soybeans than hogs and people put together.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    19

    Post

    Same here on the polyurathane, but I'd thin the first coat so that it soaks in better. I once made a darkroom sink this way, it never leaked or bloomed.
    The last time I hade a wooden feeder, though, I used an oil-based primer, a top-grade latex top-coat and three more coats of water-base poly. This was seven years ago and that feeder is still in service. None of those coatings still exist in the same formulation, though, so my information is pretty useless.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    estevan, sask, canada
    Posts
    185

    Post

    Coat the seals with hot parafin wax,Heat the feader in oven 1st so it seals good is another way.
    B. roger eagles

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,267

    Post

    I use fiberglass resin instead of polyurethane.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    471

    Post

    Why not beeswax?? It's free and smells a lot better than all that other cr**!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    I've also heard of those who invert it and let the bees propolize it up. It's also been done with the "frame" feeders. I can't testify wheither it works or not.
    WayaCoyote
    WayaCoyote

  8. #8

    Post

    I use poly on my feeders inside and out, let them air for a week and then seal the seams with beeswax. (Why not its free and the bees made it, therefore they will accept it!)
    If you see me runnin' you'd better keep up!
    http://hillshivery.blogspot.com/

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