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Thread: Slatted racks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

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    After doing some reading on this board, thought I'd try slatted racks. Ordered 5 from Brushy Mt when I was at the NC/SC convention and they arrived yesterday. Made one today. Whatta pain! Somebody please reassure me that it's gonna be worth my while to put these things together.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Bridgewater VT. USA
    Posts
    238

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    Tia
    I would prefer the model of slatted rack with the slats running the same way as the frames allowing the V mites to fall to the bottom and through the screen without hitting a slat running the opposite way. but they do help with swarm reduction. I just make my own. thinking of trying a variation on the de hive.
    Stuart

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

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    I bought most of mine already assembled from Betterbee when they sold out the old style for the ones that run the same way as the frames.

    I like them ok. Before I had Screened Bottom Boards I would say they made a bigger difference. But with SBB I'm not sure they make as much difference. Still they baffle the ventilation coming in to make the brood nest well ventilated but not drafty and that is what they really accomplish, IMO.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    Would a shallow filled with plastic foundation or comb accomplish the same thing as a slatted rack?
    Rob Koss

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,899

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    It would be a draft breaker and clustering space.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,385

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    ikeepbees:
    Would a shallow filled with plastic foundation or comb accomplish the same thing as a slatted rack?
    I don't think so. Besides giving the bees a staging area for incoming and outgoing foragers, modifying the ventilation, it provides the bees a platform/ladder between the bottom board and the frames. Nothing else quite provides this same service.

    http://cordovan-honeybee.com/slatted...to_gallery.htm
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    If I understand you correctly, Joseph, comb or foundation would not act as a ladder or platform while the slats would?
    Rob Koss

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

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    The deal with slatted racks is this -

    Someone noticed long ago that the frame surfaces
    nearest the entrance rarely had eggs laid in them
    by the queen. If they used an entrance reducer,
    the problem went away, but the smaller entrance
    started looking like the tool booths on the Shin
    Kuko Expressway at 4:30pm on a Friday.

    So, slatted racks were born. It is a
    light-reduction thing, nothing more. You could
    do lots of different things that would have
    the same effect, but slatted racks have been
    around for so long, they have gathered a patina
    of respectability. They have also gathered a
    whole truckload of folklore, mostly claims that
    they help in swarm prevention, "proper" airflow
    circulation, and likely even wax-moth control.

    Uh huh, sure.

    Do they work? Sure, in regards to the impact
    on the cells nearest the entrance, but this is
    only a marginal difference - a small number
    of cells that were not used for brood can then
    be used for brood. Are they worth it? No,
    not at all - work out the number of cells in
    your brood chamber versus how many cells a
    queen could "fill" with eggs until the first
    egg she laid hatches out to a bee, even at
    a wildly optimistic rate like 2500 eggs per day,
    and "discount" by various percentages for
    food stores around the edges of the frames.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    A popular thing here in Nebraska is to take a four inch wide piece of 3/8" plywood and three four inch long pieces of lath and make an entrance reducer that makes that baffle like a slatted rack. The people who use them claim they keep out the mice, although the size hole seems too big to me, and they get the benefit of the brood all the way to the front.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    I've used Killion Boards for years. I make my own using the original bottom board style as Killion.
    It has a 2" opening on one side and the standard 3/8" opening on the other. The Killion Board can slide in from the front.
    There are a couple of pictures on one of the construction articles:
    http://nordykebeefarm.com/forum/forum_topics.asp?FID=6
    I'll post some more pictures and plans when I get through with the ones I have posted already.
    Jon, N6VC/5

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