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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,280

    Post

    Been to Sears, Lowe's, Home Depot etc. looking at 10" portable table saws. The more I look, the more confused I become. I have a reallllly old Craftsman I bought at a yard sale a few years ago that weighs so much it's pretty much stationary. I'd like something I can stow or move without a crane or another person. In looking at what's available I don't even recognize most of the brands. Many have bases that are plastic, aluminum tables, and blade guards that don't look like they'd even make the trip home without breaking. I'm not gonna wear a table saw out by a long shot, but I'd like something moderatly priced that will last a while rather than a throw-away. So, what's your recommendation for a no frills table saw that will be used to build beekeeping woodenware and other minor projects around the house (no serious contracting stuff planned) in the $250 range?
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Louisa VA, USA
    Posts
    28

    Post

    I would look at the dewalt portable table saw. Its a nice unit.

    Chris

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    Easy!

    Go here:
    http://www.sears.com/sr/craftsman/cr...vertical=SEARS

    Click on "See Our Hot Buys"

    Buy a "10 in. Table Saw with Dust Collection System and Casters" for $179.99

    Its really a decent saw, and the good thing
    about Sears is that you can use it for a week,
    and if you don't like it, get every penny back.

    People laugh at me about Sears tools until I show
    them my 55 year-old ratchet wrench, still my
    favorite. My grandfather bought it, and I still
    use it. It it ever breaks, they will fix it, no
    questions asked.

    Craftsman club is free to join, and they do
    offer some real deals to "members" that are
    never mentioned to the general public.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    ROYBI, got mine from Home Depot, makes a good table saw, both portable and permenent. I've got one and I like the features.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    996

    Post

    craftsman=crapsman! not like the old ones!! Roybi not much better...get the dewalt or if it was me I would get a belt driven..,much better than a direct drive. You can get a grizzly (grizzly.com) for not much more...pretty good tools. I just bought a Jet with cast iron top/wings and nice fence for $400 on Ebay incl wheels(cost 900 new). Sold my OLD craftsman for 275 and there is no comparison in the saws!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    Most (if not all) entry level small saws are made in China. Not a put down, but a reality. DeWalt is owned by Black and Decker and its quality has suffered recently as well. It is still a good saw mind you........ just not built like they were only a few years ago.

    Try making your old Craftsman work. I have one as well and I made a stand with castors and it rolls around like a dream. The larger table is always nice.

    I also have an old (50's) ShopMaster made in Mpls Minn. What a fantastic small saw!! Check ebay for a high quality old timer before spending more money on a cheap import.......

    In woodworking tools, old is ofter better.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    21

    Post

    The Dewalt direct drive saw is not much for the money, it should cost less for what you get. It all depends on the performance you expect. I've never found Craftsman worth messing with IMO. They are a pain to adjust, weaker than other direct drives, very cheap/light construction. But the price is very cheap too.

    Make sure you get a real 15 amp saw, not a 10 or 12 amp motor that I found on the largest Craftsman saws. I find the 110 volt saws to be weak when ripping, the true 15 amp motors that drive via a belt last much longer and can be replaced easy.

    Good saws cost money. But, my favorite cheap saw is the Delta Shop Master line, around $300. The fence is not bad and the controls actually work ok. You can change the blade angle with out the usual cheap saw fight. Make sure you like the blade controls. Most of the "Home Owner" saws are very light duty and hard to use when adjusting. That cheap direct drive Delta has lasted over a year for us, but we don't push it real hard. It will get hot ripping one inch boards and 3/4 ply. You must pace the direct drive saws if you want them to last. The Delta Shop Master has over 40 hives worth of cutting. Made 12 hive top feeders. Plus over 20 plywood Nucs. This saw really needs a 6" dado blade. My 8" works it too much.

    Consider one that comes with its own stand. I've used table top saws in the past and will always recommend a contractor style if you need to move it often.

    You may also consider a used commercial radial arm saw thats belt driven. My Dad has a very old Magna Shop Smith that works great. Very solid and strong. Its been used for many years and will dado great. You can break it down for moving it, I perfer to leave it together though. Its not super heavy. But, its not light either.

    Lowes had the best prices on Delta last time I looked. I bought a display model for over $100 off their normal price which is well below retail.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,648

    Post

    My old Makita has been good.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,207

    Post

    keep the old saw you have. Put a decent mobile base under it so you can move it without lifting. Add a decent fence.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,196

    Post

    I bought the DeWalt table saw myself. It has an aluminum top, plastic base, and metal folding stand. However, it costs $500. I did not like any of the cheaper ones out there. For me, the cost is worth having a very precise saw that is easy for one person to move around. I'd have to disagree with Jim on Craftsman. Their power tools are nothing I would use on my jobs. Even their socket wrench has become cheap compared to years ago.

    - Barry . . . the other one.
    Regards, Barry

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    Craftsman tools used to be very good for the money. The older vintage saws are not too bad.

    I am done buying Craftsman hand tools though. The rachets have gone down hill......

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    &gt;- Barry . . . the other one.

    That should be "Barry . . . The ONE"

    I also think you you should have Queen Bee as your title.

    I have an early 80's Craftsman 10" saw that has built one house and a myrad of projects in the last twenty years, it's been great. I have no complaints, but it is heavy and not what the other Barry needs. I have also had good luck with the battery opperated (18.6) drills and saws all.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    The Skil brand portable was the best one we found last year about this time at Lowes. I never see this saw except around christmas and a month or so after. It is in the $200 range. Most of the portables fences are not self squaring even though they say they are. Clamp it and then push on the fence a bit and see how much it moves. All the portable craftsman were junk. Craftsman does still make a great table saw in the shop models. The dewalt I would say is equal to if not a bit better but the price difference was not worth it. If you can find the black and decker table saw buy it(I don't know if they still make it). It is the same as the dewalt with a bit smaller motor and made a different color.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,280

    Post

    You all have been great. Again. I suppose my first step is to resurrect the Craftsman monster. It's been neglected and I feel badly about that, but I think it's still serviceable. Unmoveable, but probably serviceable. The base and writing style lead me to think it's from the late 50's or early 60's. I'll have to scrounge around and find numbers to see if replacement parts are available. Doesn't look like there were ever any safety devices on it. Thanks.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    I got a cheap little roybi. If you want to do rabbet joints by just cutting from two sides, it works great. The only rabbet blade that fits it is one of those off center ones and it only cuts 5/8" grooves. It kinda wish it would cut 3/4". But it's small and light and cheap and I can haul it out in the yard to use it and put it back in the garage when I'm done.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Clayton Indiana
    Posts
    348

    Post

    I too, have to disagree with Jim F(sorry Jim)about Craftsman. The power tools they sell now are not worth bring home from the store. I have a "portable" table saw(craftsman) It works well, but it is too light weight. It wants to tip when you are pushing the wood into the blade. I almost tipped it over one day, while it was on!! My Delta contractor saw on a moble base is a dream to use. I wouldn't have anything else.
    Todd Zeiner

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    I still like my Roybi
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Harriman, Tn
    Posts
    175

    Post

    http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...id=00921804000
    I have this craftsman and I built all of my bee equiptment with it. If I had to do it again I would buy the same saw.

    I run this dado
    http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=prod...00061089-SD208


    24 deeps
    12 mid'
    12 tops
    12 sbb
    12 inner covers
    I rip all of my wood down to size and buy 2x3 and rip them down inorder to make my sbb sides and my top covers.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Julian, NC, USA
    Posts
    252

    Post

    I have used a craftsman for several years with few complaints. I plan on upgrading and will consider a Bosch next time.
    http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS...-D25X-_-167224
    This one has the power to not get bogged down when ripping a 2X4. You will become frustrated quickly if you buy something that overheats or "just cant cut it".

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    Rebuild the Old Craftsman for sure. A base with castors is wonderful.

    I have my vintage Craftsman set up with a Oldham Dado and my vintage ShopMaster set up to cross cut.

    To get a table saw of the same quality as my 50's Craftsman I would have to spend $500.00 bucks or more. I paid $50.00 at auction 5 years ago.

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