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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    winnipeg,Manitoba,Canada
    Posts
    93

    Post

    I was wondering if anybody had an idea to make a wax spinner out of a Jones 4 frame extractor. I'm also looking for ideas on making my own motorised feed tank system. Plan on using a 300 gallon plastic tank if I can find a used one?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,226

    Post

    I was talking to a buddy of mine about converting his old four frame extractor into a spinner. Once you start thinking about it, it starts to make sence. We figured all that would have to be modified is the removal of the screen holders and a continous small meshed screen put into place around the inner spiner. Make a bottom in the spinner so wax will not fall down into the honey. Might just be practical enough to make it work.

    I was going to install an electric pump to my tank but never got around to it last year. Ended up using gravity. Worked good, except it was a little slow as the tank emptied, and when the surip cooled. I got by just fine,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,226

    Post

    Say, how was your crop last season? How did your bees look going into winter?

    Hope you dont mind me asking
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    Ian
    What size mesh are you thinking about using?
    What RPM do you think is "fast enough"?

    I recently pick up a small hand crank extractor
    (which I thought I had sold, but i think the deal fell apart.)

    http://www.betterbee.com/products.asp?dept=1249

    I was thinking about modifying it to make a spinner. I'd have to hook up a motor some how. I have the Maxant chain uncapper and there is quite a bit of honey left in the cappings, even after a few days of draining. The spinner would
    "speed" things along for me. Thanks.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,226

    Post

    Havnt quit figured out where to get the mesh. Perhaps some grain cleaning screens, small seed screen? Perhaps a metal faburcator would be able to get something together. My old spinner's holes are fairly big, pencel sized. maybe a smaller hole would be better?
    As for RPM, faster the better I think. As long as you can feed the spinner to keep it balanced, RPM should be high. Seems like my old spinner is going to fly off its handles sometimes. I have it feeding from a wax auger kind of continously. I have gotten an old 1/2 HP motor on it.
    I have pulled so much honey from my wax capping with this machine, that it has paid for itself many times over in the last few years.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Louisa VA, USA
    Posts
    28

    Post

    You could just use a salad spinner to spin cappings. They are available pretty cheaply. You couldn't do a lot of cappings, but it would work for a smaller operation.

    Chris

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    I used to be in the laundromat business & have a coupla old front load washers left. The tubs (inner & outer) are stainless steel; the inner is perforated. wondered if this might work or if it needs more openings than the perforations in the tub. Thought about setting the tub on a frame so it's open on top instead of in the front. Thoughts?

    Lew

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    winnipeg,Manitoba,Canada
    Posts
    93

    Post

    Hi Ian

    Well it was a very tough year to say the least! I had about 35 wintered colonies and bought 50 nucs. I came out with 148lbs/ hive averaged out! Not bad cosidering I got the Nucs the last week of June! This year I plan on expanding at a smaller scale , hopefully do a good majority of splits on what comes out of the winter. The hives looked not bad,I had alot of swarms and the queens were still brooding up in September, so lots of young bees for wintering but also alot of comb not filled with winter stores!Time will tellI guess, I went to visit the hives on the weekened and there was some definet activity lots of cleansing flights so that's good. I'm hoping for a 10-20% winter kill. With all the swarming, cool weather, late honey flow, late feeding who knows? There is also the potential of alot of canola being used in the brood chambers. big time granulation!!! Well now that I have been thruogh the worst beekeeping year in history of most of the guys that I talk to I am definetly ready for a normal year!!! This was my second year of beekeeping. My first was with 6 hives than my secong was with 85 hives. How about yourself? How was your year?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    estevan, sask, canada
    Posts
    185

    Post

    I will never let my bees near conola,cause 1 time,Granulation.Yew got to be rite on it.Late swarming was a problem here and bev said there toat tree send man..Crop here was good,average over 6 barrels on 12 hives,so around 300 per hive.Had vew last fall wouldn,t take feed,Built up an bought,Got21 out side,100%,put away 7 nooks i built,1 gone,So things ain't to bad yet.March is our worst time if wet,can't feed,and those 2ft freeky snow storms.
    B. roger eagles

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,226

    Post

    You sound as if you had much the same year as me. The snow in May really hammered my hives, and went into the flow weak. But thanks to the abundance of bloom right to frost, I managed to get 155lbs/hive. I took 260 into winter, have another 50 hives comming next spring.
    Basically take your post and put my name at the end of it. We had a very simular year.
    Lot of guys hardly broke 100lbs last year, so I think us rookies did alright.
    I never worry about canola honey in my outdoor hives. Actually I feel better known that there is some in there for the iwnter. It can hold bees longer than surip, except if you are wintering indoors, then it gets a bit tricky.
    Anyway, I figure if I managed last year, I can handle anything.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    estevan, sask, canada
    Posts
    185

    Post

    Those low lb. ones were mostly russian strain wern't they?
    B. roger eagles

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,226

    Post

    Not necisarily. Theses guys with lower lbs had problem becasue the cool wet weather compounded problems for them, from what I gather. One guy I know couldnt get to his yard to collect is last honey, so it all garanulated on him. Other guys here had hives start to starve throughout the snow, rainy weather in the spring and couldnt get to feed them before damage was done.

    I have heard of Russians strains producing less honey. The fellow next to me here has been involved in breeding mite tolerance into his bee stock. He has brought a mite tolerating russian strain into some of the area select hives. And is actually started a strain that not only tolerates(notice I said "tolerates"), but has captured traits of heavey brooding, and heavey honey collection. Wouldnt of believed it if I hadnt stumbled upon some of there queens. I acctually notices sutch a difference in hygenic behaviour characteristics that I went back to confront him of what he was doing. I now believe all the mite tolerante claims those US breeders are claiming in the magazines,...
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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