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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,144

    Post

    Anybody have an opinon on the best way to set up a jig for mass producing box joints. I was origionally going to set up with a table saw, but a router and table may be comming into my life soon. Also, what would be easier for making som T&G stock, the router table or table saw with a molding head with appropriate knives?
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Clayton Indiana
    Posts
    348

    Post

    The key is to set up a production run. Get all the boards cut to lenght and stacked up. Then whatever method you choose, all the joints will be the same.

    I use a butt joint with a Kreg Jig. www.kregtool.com The one I have is a k2000 It sells for $140 With glue, it outpreforms any other joint I have come across. I usually make 10 deeps and 20 mediums in one production run. All in my two car garage.
    Todd Zeiner

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,196

  4. #4

    Post

    I have tried different way to make joints. depends on what you really want or need. I have used rabbit joints on my equiptment for yrs. they are strong and don't need any special extra tools. I use a dado blade. but in a pinch have just used my table saw blade to cut rabbits. I have gotten 20yrs from some my boxes. I feel if I get 5=6 yrs doing commercial beekeeping I got my money out of them. just depends on how you handle your boxes.=Don

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cooperstown,N.Y.
    Posts
    474

    Post

    Hi JBJ;
    I am a carpenter of 23 years,I've got 10 fingers
    so I guess I've been sucessful.
    I think a tablesaw with a dado blade would be my choice.Make a dedicated crosscut sled(some guys call them crosscut boxes)that you can use year after year.
    I suggest making the rear fence tall enough to really support the workpiece(s),and long enough to incorporate a flipstop so you can cut the sides to length too.
    I fasten a registration block(make it a frog hair narrower&shorter than your dado is set)to the fence,away from the outside of the dado by the width of your dado. Then you make your first cut tight to the registration block(the board is standing up right?).Then you pull sled back,put the first cut over the registration block and make second cut,repeatfor third cut,etc.
    I think Fine Woodworking magazine would cover both the sled and some jigs.
    I think the t&g cutter in a table might be my choice,matched set,not a adjustable.
    If I only wanted a little,and wanted to save my cash,I would use a sacrifical wood face on my fence(so my dado could be partly buried by the fence)and run my t&g that way.
    Good luck,You know it might not hurt to get the router table anyway,I'd say 3 H.P. don't you think?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,144

    Post

    Thanks for the excellant feedback! Still trying to locate a molding head for the table saw, and if I can utilize materials on hand (rough sawn incense cedar) for some lids and bottoms I can save enough $ to get the router and table.
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    JBJ:

    Sears used to sell a pretty good moulding head for tablesaws for a decent price. You could buy many different kinds of cutters for it, and it seemed to match some kind of standard as I have since found other makes of cutters that fit it.
    Ox
    Oxankle

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    My problem with rabbet joints is that they
    assume that the wood is very planar. Box
    joints are much more forgiving of lousy
    wood, and lousy wood is more and more common.

    Cupped, bowed, crappy stuff. If I was to
    examine each board at the lumber mill or
    lumber yard, I'd be there all darned day,
    and might as well just buy supers, and
    save myself the trouble.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,479

    Post

    >> If I was to
    examine each board at the lumber mill or
    lumber yard, I'd be there all darned day,

    You guys should scrap this soft wood lumber dispute b/w our two countries and you'll get a whole lot of good stuff down there quick,...
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,269

    Post

    Well now ,as a logger for most of my life,I will disagree with you on that!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > soft wood lumber dispute...

    Ummm, think with great care about the situation,
    and look at the bigger picture:

    1) The Mideast has oil.

    2) The US wants to assure a stable world oil
    supply.

    3) The Mideast is visited by several hundred
    thousand of the best-trained, best equipped
    troops the planet has ever seen, backed by
    carrier battle groups, recon satellites,
    and even long-range munitions fired from
    ships not even in that theater of operations.

    Now, let's compare:

    1) Canada has so many trees, they sell the timber
    on Federal land at bargain-basement prices just
    to keep employment in the logging sector up.

    2) The US sees those below-market sales as a
    "federal subsidy" for Canadian lumber.

    3) Canada wants to somehow deny this, despite
    the public information available on the
    timber sales.

    Regardless of how your national pride might
    come into play about all of this, wouldn't you
    much rather be a country with something the US
    doesn't want than a country with something the
    US wants? [img]smile.gif[/img]

    And what happens when someone invents a big
    ugly machine that makes all that Alberta oil
    shale less expensive to extract than oil from
    ocean platforms?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    Comment--> I think a tablesaw with a dado blade would be my choice.Make a dedicated crosscut sled(some guys call them crosscut boxes)that you can use year after year.
    I suggest making the rear fence tall enough to really support the workpiece(s),and long enough to incorporate a flipstop so you can cut the
    I fasten a registration block(make it a frog hair narrower&shorter than your dado is set)to the fence,away from the outside of the dado by the width of your dado. Then you make your first cut tight to the registration block(the board is standing up right?).Then you pull sled back,put the first cut over the registration block and make second cut,repeatfor third cut,etc.

    Reply--> This is exactly how I do it. You can make this jig from scrap wood, and use it for years to come. The only problem, is that is the only joint size you can make accurrately. (at least for me) But I can get it setup, and get perfect box joints all the time. It really works well.
    Dale Richards<br />Dal-Col Apiaries<br />

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,479

    Post

    &gt;&gt;Regardless of how your national pride might
    come into play about all of this,

    Wow, hit a nerve there, didnt I.

    Well, I'm not going to get into an arguement here about subsidies, I am a farmer you know. I know all about the good subsidies bad subsidies, your subsiding, no I'm not subsiding, the never ending country to country court battle trade war. I was just poking fun at you.

    I guess it just depends on which side of the fence you are on when determining opinions on sutch subsidies.

    Who can blame loggermike for agreeing with the current tarrif on Canadian soft woodlumber. Money in his pocket, and well deserved. And who can blame that North Dakota'n farmer for lobbying their govn't to take the Canadian Wheat board to court, for the ten time,(which they lost AGAIN). Money in his pocket,and well deserved. Look at the honey trade dispute with Argintina. Iwas in favour, I saw huge spin off from it. I'm sure the Argintian beekeeper thought different,..

    Its all just a political game, but still I think if all countries agree to world/country trade activities, they should all follow the rules. Otherwise, whats the point? :confused:

    I dont know if you like Bush and his gonvt at all, but one thing is for certian, he looks after his producers. And if that means protectionism, companied with lavishly subsidizing his domestic producers and making use of every trade loop hole in the book to boost domestic return, then he would of gotten my vote too.

    Anyhow, we win some, we loose some
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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