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Thread: 8-frame hives?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
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    I was looking through a supply cataloge that includes in it 8-frame hives and parts. One benefit that was offered is that the supers would be lighter than the 10-frame counterparts. It would seem to me that the supers would get capped sooner... So, I'm interested....

    However, I'm also concerned about over-wintering capabilities and effects on broodnest shape.

    Has anyone else used these? What do you think the pros and cons would be?

    WayaCoyote
    WayaCoyote

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,212

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    >Has anyone else used these? What do you think the pros and cons would be?

    I am buying no more 10 frame boxes. I've been buying nothing but 8 frame boxes for the last year.

    Pros: Light weight.

    Cons: More expensive (about the same, but it holds two less frames). The hive gets taller. Other than that, I have no complaints at all.

    Since I'm planing down the end bars to 1 1/4" I can fit 9 of them in an eight frame box. The eight frame box has a bit more generous left over space after eight frames than a 10 frame box has with 10 frames. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    They also make nice nucs for overwintering. Here's eight of them stacked together:

    http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bush/ima...sWintering.JPG
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
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    My second year keeping bees I got a 8 frame hive from an old timer. He used only 8 frame equipment and wintered them in Upstate New York.
    I changed the hive over to standard 10 frame only because that was what I had as a standard.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
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    My bugaboo issue with 8 frame is that the hive height gets out of hand very soon. I know it goes against some peoples perceptions but a square hive that holds about 14 frames is more to my liking.

    The rationale is that a square hive is much harder to overturn than a rectangular 8 or 10 frame Langstroth size. For its size, it holds about 30% more in a single box than a 10 frame and about 50% more than an 8 frame. It is just large enough that I can overwinter a full size colony in a single box IF I so desire. It takes less material to build a given volume for bee use

    The negatives are the size and weight of a full box, the non-standard size (I have to build my own but so what, I build all my own hive equipment), and the mechanics of hauling the hives around.

    Fusion

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

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    With my bad back I am using all mediums because a deep is over my weight limit. A full medium is about 10 pounds over my weight limit but as of yet has not been a problem as my hive numbers are low and I have been splitting them to make more hives so not much honey to be moved. I am thinking about going to 8 frame boxes. Some one gave me the idea of using nucs on top of regular 10 frame boxes as supers. But I really do not thing this would be very stable. I love my bees and want to increase again this year while keeping some hives for production. With hives only 6 inches off the ground the bigger ones this past summer were chest high. If these hives had not been robbed of brood for splits they would have been way to tall to work. Going to an 8 frame box would make them even taller. I may make a few 8 frames to see how I like them but want to keep everything standard.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

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    I like the long hives the best, as far as my back. But you could also go with a bottom box twice as wide as the 8 frame boxes and put two stacks of supers on top of it. That would make, with standard width frames 17 frames in the bottom box. You would get 19 frames in the bottom box with 1 1/4" wide frames.

    Most of my long mediums are 48 3/4" long.

    Still it's much nicer working 8 frame boxes. Especially for supers.

    One can always do what Killion always did. Use 10 frame boxes for the brood chamber and 8 frame boxes for the supers. Then just put a board on the side of the first 8 frame box to cover the gap. The nice thing about this plan is you don't have to buy new bottom boards, just supers and lids. And if you have migratory lids you can always just cut them down.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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