Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: shims

  1. #1
    twind59 Guest

    Question

    I have to confess my ignorance....what is an Imirie shim?
    Barry
    Indianapolis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    710

    Post

    See the explanation from George Imirie himself: http://www.beekeeper.org/imirie_shims.html

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Catonsville, MD. USA
    Posts
    251

    Cool

    My recommendation after having used them:

    Don't.

    The bees will create all kinds of burr comb in that area. Provide upper entrances using an exlcuder (wood bound) or inner cover.

    Thanx.

  4. #4

    Post

    my reply for shim's [don't] you need not buy any thing. my self I use a 3/4 drilled hole under hand holds. bees can use for entrence and you got air flow too and by just putting some duck tape over it winter time works fine. I don't run out a buy all the gadgets that comes on the market. just use some good old common sense. Don

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    There is a time and place for everything. But I have to agree that using them in the middle of the stack has it's problems with burr comb.

    However it can be used above the inner cover if you have the type of cover that does not have a notch in it. My favorite use is for placing the queen cage, especially usefull with PC. When the queen is released the shim is removed along with the cage.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,531

    Post

    I tried ONE this summer on a strong hive and they glued the opening shut it 3 days.

    I use them on top of the inter cover in the winter for an uper entrance and I also put a piece of foam insulation 1/2" thick on top of it and fill most on the space it creates with dry sugar so I call it a sugar ring.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    san antonio.texas USA
    Posts
    488

    Post

    During a strong nectar flow I side a super towards the rear about 3/4 inch to where the rear seam is barely covered. The front of the super has a nice entrance due to the ridge that has been cut on the shell front to hold the top bars. What are the disadvantages of this method over shims or hole drilling?

  8. #8
    twind59 Guest

    Post

    Thanks. I read the post on the link...interesting and well explained. Another bit o' information to save should it be needed in the future.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Post

    I used them as entrances for my two-queen colony this past summer and they worked very well.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Mister Imirie would say:
    USE THEM ONLY WITH DRAWN COMB IN A HONEY FLOW! I like them over a queen excluder so the bees dont have to work so hard to get to the storage area. This may inhibit burr comb. I too have had that problem.

    dickm

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,081

    Post

    They are complete waste. For every benefit they give, the same can be accomplished without them using some other easier method or manipulation. The shim takes up room to store, one more thing to move about in the store room, they cause burr comb, must be installed/removed,...you get my point.

  12. #12
    demerl51 Guest

    Post

    Hi Guys,

    >I tried ONE this summer on a strong hive and >they glued the opening shut it 3 days.

    Bees just hate upward ventilation and will quickly seal the smallest leak, even during a major honey flow. I have another take on upward ventilation. Check out:
    http://wind.prohosting.com/tbhguy/bee/plex.htm

    Let me know what you think.

    >During a strong nectar flow I side a super >towards the rear about 3/4 inch... >disadvantages of this method over shims or >hole drilling?

    The bees don't like the sharp edges of the supers and will chew/dissolve the wood making the edges smooth and round. Super that were tightly fitting before being slid, often will have gaps after the process, particularly in the thinner wood in the frame rest area.

    Regards
    Dennis

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,610

    Post

    They are wonderful for all sorts of things they weren't designed for. Like making room for putting a queen cage on top of the bars of the brood nest. Or putting a lot of queen cages in a queen bank.

    I don't use them much for their intended purpose though.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads