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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    I've never made hives for myself because the cost of wood in my area is more than the cost of precut hive parts.

    I've read that some of you folks have been building hive bodies from old pallet wood. I have pallets available from my greenhouse business, but I'm not sure how to proceed.

    If I pull the pallets apart I get boards that are long enough to use, but not wide enough to make anything but a very shallow super.

    Do you edge-glue boards together to get enough width to make full depth hive bodies? If so, do you use biscuits or dowels or just glue?

    Thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,104

    Post

    I suppose I'm lazy. The bees will fill any cracks and it's really only a matter of respecting the inerior bee space. So I would just stagger the seams and nail them together. You can either use a solid end and use two boards for the side or you can do the end with the seam on place and the side with the seam another place. Of course sometimes the boards warp and things don't turn out like you wanted, but you can also cover the seam with a 1 by 2 for a cleat to carry the hive by.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Big Grin

    Used pallets and scraps from a lumber yard is what I use also. Sometimes you come apon 'specialty pallets' like the ones used to transport engines and other types of equipment, those useally use wider boards and/or plywood. Great for makeing bee boxes. It's cheap also.
    You'll find out it's fun to use what others throw away 'cause it's job is done, plus it is a good way to recycle.

    ------------------
    'WHEN WE CLOSE OUR EYES WE ALL LOOK THE SAME' GWPW 03

    [This message has been edited by SilverFox (edited November 30, 2004).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Cool

    Find a couple of local companies that occasionally get crated equipment delivered. They usually have to pay someone to haul away the crating and packing materials (usually plywood, some good lumber like 2X6's and 2X4's) -> you can haul it away for half the cost or for free and have a good supply of bee equip materials. I've made many bee equip items (tops, bottoms, supers) from the crating wood I've collected from my company. If you're a miser like me, you can even use the screws and nails. A tube of 40-year caulking compound does wonders for filling cracks and holes to smooth things out for painting.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Cool

    I've recently found a person I can get concret form plywood from, 13/16" lamanated on one side, full sheets,4'x8', for $8.00. Its been oil-treated should last a looooooooooong time, just a few nail holes, and/or bolt holes. Now if I can just get my box joints down.

    ------------------
    'WHEN WE CLOSE OUR EYES WE ALL LOOK THE SAME' GWPW 03

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,104

    Post

    I'm not sure how you or the bees will like old concrete forms. We used to spray them with oil too, but it was really just diesel fuel and both sides were usually covered in concrete dust mixed with diesel at best and a scale of concrete at worst. Cutting it dulled all our saw blades because of the concrete and it had holes at regular intervals for the ties that held the two sides together. Before you buy a bunch, I'd go take a look (and maybe a smell) of it. I'd be afraid they have diesel fuel on them and I'd be afraid the diesel fumes would drive the bees out.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Checked them out already, they cut real nice and easy, the oil doesn't really have any oder, and like I said one side is lamenated w/a smooth tan vaneer. I rubbed my fingers accross the surface and had just a trace of oily residue still couldn't smell any thing. You wouldn't belive how nice it cuts. I think they use a release oil, there is very little concret residue if any on it. Next time I send you some sage I might include a small (2x2") piece.
    Someone down the street has some that is 5/8" for $4.00 a sheet. He called it 'cold stock'.

    ------------------
    'WHEN WE CLOSE OUR EYES WE ALL LOOK THE SAME' GWPW 03

    [This message has been edited by SilverFox (edited December 03, 2004).]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

    Post

    "I rubbed my fingers accross the surface and had just a trace of oily residue still couldn't smell any thing. "

    Bear in mind that you are producing food in these boxes and oil such as you describe is often not something you would want near food - even in the smallest of quantities.

    Keith

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,104

    Post

    I certainly was impressed by the NEW forms with that resin impregnated finish. It looks like, if you weren't beating it up putting concrete in it, it would last forever.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Medina, OH USA
    Posts
    69
    I get a lot of 2x10's from builders. Use them for pollination hives. Cut some down and use them as 8-9 frame supers on these 2x10's. Heavy? Yes but who carries more than 1 box back to the truck?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,104

    Post

    I always thought a two by would make a nice brood chamber for overwintering better because of the added insulation. But I wouldn't want to lift very many of them.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    west monroe LA USA
    Posts
    60

    Post

    go to the lowes website fox. There click on services, or something like that then type in box joint on the search window. It has a excellent plan for making a jig that works really good and is made out of a straight piece of 2 by 6 about 30 inches long. Really good plan there with a video also. It is easy to do box joints, but the frames are not worth trying when I can buy them for less than a dollar a piece from betterbeeout of Greenwich, NY. I made 10 of them and have decided that i am burning too much electricity and time to build them.

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