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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Northren MN
    Posts
    57

    Post

    Just wondering on suggestion on if metal excluder or plastic work best for honey production.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    I tried the plastic excluders when they first came out and founf that the bees would cover them with wax and propolis. When we removed them and tried to clean them 50 of them broke or cracked. I have not tried the new/improved as I now have Metal excluders for all hives but only use them when needed.
    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan
    Beekeeping sence 1964

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    I'll have to say my preferece is NO excluder, but I prefer the wood bound metal ones to everything else. The bees burr the wood bound ones. They propolize the plain metal ones. They propolize the plastic ones. The ones I like the LEAST are the punched plastic ones. The newer plastic ones are rounded, sort of like the metal ones except made of plastic.

    Prying up a burr combed bound excluder seems to disrupt the bees less than peeling off a propolized plastic excluder.

    But I like the price on the plastic ones.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    Oh... and another advantage to the wood bound ones, they are easier to spot when getting ready for winter so you don't accidently leave one on (a bad idea). Another good idea, Jim Fischer says he paints his a different bright color so they stand out.

  5. #5
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    > Jim Fischer says he paints his a different
    > bright color so they stand out.

    Day-Glo orange and red, man. No worse or
    easier error than leaving an excluder below
    a super that one has decided to "leave for
    winter stores".

    I'm so paranoid about this, I have numbered
    them all with stencils, and every one must
    be accounted for. You only have to lose
    one queen (and hence the hive) to learn
    "the hard way".

    The plastic ones are just fine with me.
    I bought a few just to play with, and
    while they are thin, they can be frozen
    and cleaned by flexing and scraping.
    They won't last as long as any of the
    metal ones, but we might as well get used
    to the replacement of metal and wood with
    various plastics, and enjoy how much
    cheaper they are.

    How to see a plastic one at 50 yards? Easy!
    Get some of the industrial and garage floor
    yellow and black striped "caution tape", and
    run it around the edges to make the tape
    stick out from the hive. The tape sticks
    good, and lasts for years under even
    extreme environments, like heliport landing
    pads in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Catonsville, MD. USA
    Posts
    252

    Cool

    Yes, wood-bound painted day-glo orange is the way to go. George Imirie suggested this in his Pink Pages years ago and believe me, you CANNOT miss one left on a hive. Another advantage to the wood bound is that you can make an upper entrance for the bees to use during the flow thereby bypassing the brood chamber. Less congestion that way.

    Thanx.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Post

    The edges of my excluders are painted red, Imirie shims are orange, deeps are white, mediums are pink and shallows are yellow. Makes changing things out soooo easy. And the yard's soooo colorful!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    >The edges of my excluders are painted red, Imirie shims are orange, deeps are white, mediums are pink and shallows are yellow. Makes changing things out soooo easy. And the yard's soooo colorful!

    It must be nice to have a system.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    I use the mismatched paints and free paints from my cousin who builds houses and additions. So no system can be made, but then again I only have one size of box to deal with(well I still have one deep box and one deep nuc to get rid of). Thanks for the tip about using the tape on excluders. My excluders are metal bond metal so it will make finding them easier.

  10. #10
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    > George Imirie suggested this...

    I missed the Maryland fall meeting.
    How is George doing?
    I worry about him sometimes.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Northren MN
    Posts
    57

    Post

    thank you for all the input> Muchly apreciated. The thing with putting notch in wood excluder for bees to bypass brood chamber is a good Idea.but what if your queen decides to leave or mate and come back aint that a risk of her getting up into the honey to lay eggs.And the other problem I ran into with using an exluder the bees put all the honey in the deeps and have been leaving the 1 super to fill last this makes for a week wintering hive wouldnt it. So I think I will paint them the orange and use the wood bound metal excluders to see how they do. I used plastic for the first time this year loss more bees than I ever have cause the deeps were full of honey no room for queen to lay anywhere in hive.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    438

    Post

    Thanks for the great idea to paint them day-glo orange...fabulous! And using them like an Imrie shim is also useful. Thanks to all for this discussion thread.

    [This message has been edited by danno1800 (edited December 16, 2004).]

  13. #13
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    > The thing with putting notch in wood
    > excluder for bees to bypass brood chamber
    > is a good Idea.but what if your queen
    > decides to leave or mate

    Well, put the notch on the side ABOVE the
    wire grid, and you won't have that problem.

    If the notch is on the underside of the grid,
    you are holding it upside down!


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Wink

    Or down side up!!!

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan
    Beekeeping sence 1964

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