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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Roanoke, VA USA
    Posts
    3

    Post

    Can anyone tell me why everyone avoids galvanized equipment other than the material is inferior to stainless steel? Is this a health issue or what?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    Yes. As I understand it, galvanized metal is not approved as Food grade for honey processing by the FDA. Stainless is. Galvanized must be coated to meet requirements. It's not that hard to coat it and coatings are avaialable from Brushy Mt. or Walter Kelly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Raymond, Mississippi, USA
    Posts
    177

    Post

    There is also a rubberized paint called "Sanitread" that will coat anything, and is acceptable for food grade use.... about 85.00 a gallon... and is what I will be using. It will seal any small leaks also.
    Search sanitread on Google... you would be amazed at this stuff.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,834

    Post

    I no longer extract from my good old galvanized extractor, I purchased another honey this season. The Extra White honey I extracted from my 36 frame Jones was just as good as the Extra White honey I have extracted from my SS Cowan unit so far.
    I would not get too consered about it. Keep it clean

    Ian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Freedom, PA USA
    Posts
    222

    Question

    I got my grandpa's old galvanized extractor, it's about 30 years old. Are you saying I have to seal it before I can use it ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,297

    Post

    I seriously doubt if anyone was ever harmed by eating honey that came from a galvanized extractor.Honey sitting in a galvanized settling tank could be a different story as the honey will react with the zinc coating in time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    Galvanized is only a health concern in the honey sits in it or on it for any length of time. So tanks are Not a good idea, uncapping table chutes and extractors are ok,as the honey isnt in contact with the metal for ant length of time. The FDA and CFIA want it all stainless now, but I still use a galvanized extractor for a back up in a pinch.

    John Russell

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Posts
    130

    Post

    Glad to hear that galvanized can be used for the extractor. Now, another question.

    I just picked up the old extractor from my father's farm where it has been stored for 25 odd years. It is a two basket, galvanized model with quite a bit of rust on the wire baskets and brackets. But it does still turn!

    Anyone have any good ideas how to go about cleaning all that rust off? Are there any safe food grade products on the market that can be used?


    [This message has been edited by honeylocust (edited August 29, 2004).]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Several years ago I cleaned out an extractor with the metal bristle thingy? that attached to the drill. Took off all the rust and then coated with I believe its called camcoat or something close to that. It is a food safe sealer that is listed in a few of the bee catalogs. One quart will do any size extractor you have. Really nice stuff that leaves a great surface. Highly recommended.

    Not sure the health risk with galvanized, but it will also give your honey a "metal" aftertaste to the honey.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Syracuse, NY (upstate)
    Posts
    247

    Post

    Zinc is not the only problem. Another problem with galvanized equipment is lead from galvanized equipment(made before 1994), most bronze and brass fittings, 50/50 solder (used for equipment before 1995). The honey doesn't need to sit in place to takeup the lead... just contact it (although concentrations increase the longer it is exposed).

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Posts
    130

    Post

    That sounds problematic. Wonder what this did to me while I was growing up?

    Part of the reason for using this old extractor is for nostalgic reasons. It takes me back to my childhood, sitting beside my father while he was extracting his honey.

    It sounds like the best thing would be to coat everything with the camcoat and not take any chances.


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