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Thread: Bee-O-Sphere

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Gillett, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    265

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    >>...are getting them shipped from where?

    I just looked up the Bee-O-Sphere on google, the original company is from Canada
    i live in PA and wont be able to get mine from my local supplier (Drapers) until 2 more weeks
    i'm waiting to hear what their price is whether i want to buy from Betterbee or not ($49.95+s/h set of 8, cheaper for 3+ sets)
    sorry to hear you might be missing the honey flow i might not get anything much this spring either, 6 brand new packaged colonies & 1 weak overwintered colony (& 2 dead)
    Deanna

  2. #22

    Post

    no bee o sphere today. hope it comes in on monday so I can get it put on soon before the tallow flow. If thats the case I will stick with the 168 grain. The gun does not kick much at all. I still need to handload it . I bought the dies years ago for another gun. When i do get to hunt deer I dont like to waste meat and this is my main reason for my focus on accuracy. Twice down in south Texas I have head shot nice bucks only to here groans from the other hunters. They were easy to find and clean. One I got mounted and you can hardly tell it. But these were just babys compared to those corn feed brutes you have up there.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Carnation, WA, USA
    Posts
    120

    Post

    jfischer said:
    "People who are getting their Bee-O-Sphere
    (a very strange name for a product that
    produces rectangular sections, dontcha think?)"

    I checked my Betterbee catalog and what I ordered was actually called "Bee-O-Pac" made by a Canadian company called Bee-O-Sphere with URL - http://www.beeosphere.com

    The Bee-O-Pac makes 4 oz rectangular sections.

    Mark

  4. #24
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    Got mine today.

    No instruction sheet, not a problem for
    anyone with an internet connection, but
    a serious error for most beekeepers.

    Cute yes, but I suspect that the bees
    will spend just as much time propolizing
    the small gaps around the edge of each
    "frame" as they spend drawing comb and
    filling it with honey.

    We shall see...


  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    > Bill can I use a 110 grain in the vls with the barrel twist that It has.

    Yes you can, however it will take some load development. The one twist in ten inches is a faster twist and will over stabilize the light bullet, it was really meant for a heavier (longer) bullet. It will not shoot as well at longer distances with the light bullet because of stabilization and wind, (ballistic coeffency), but our point here is that you have a 308 with a heavy barrel and you want to shoot varmits. You can still have a lot of fun out to 200 yards with the 110 gr bullet.

    >The one thing that I was concerned with the vls was the fact that it is not free floating it has some form of planned contact at the forend . I have read articles where upon freefloating of the vls accuracy suffered.

    Your results may vary. I would float the barrel and and bed the action then try some load development. It should shoot, what you really lack is the bedding, which is why they tend to shoot better with some pressure on the barrel.

    >The vssf and all the synthetic stocks are all freefloating ,

    and pillar bedded

    >but even so I hate to say this I just fell in love with the look feel and balance of the laminated stock.

    I like my black guns, I like my wood guns, I like my synthetic guns, I like my stainless guns, why hell, I think I like guns!

    > I am not into mags when it comes to rifles but i was looking for an upgrade over the 6mm . Our family has had good luck with the 3006 over the years but that would require a long action and is not off the shelf in the varmit series so i went with the 308 because of availabilty and it was 30 cal.

    It is hard to call anything over a 308 a varmint gun. It is even harder to to try to make one tool fit all occasions. If you are going to pop a wild dog, coon, or any large varmint, ok, just about any caliber will do. I use 7 mag for that and deer, but when it comes to prairie rats and a target rich environment, the mid range guns (22 hornet to 22-250, or 220 swift) are the best.

    >With the 110 grain bullet it will still be a big step up over the 100 grain we shoot in the 6mm and be flater than the 165 or 168.

    Not necessarily, but the use of the v-max bullet will be a big improvment, the giggle factor goes up tremendiously on the short range shots. Save your 165 / 168 grain bullets for the long shots.

    >the nato 308 works with the m1a and will be easy to get in troubled times.

    Keep it simple, keep it nato.

    >Any comments on the non floating barrel vls 308. Please be honest! or, did I put beauty before accuracy?

    See above. Some say show don't go, but with a little work it can.

    > But these were just babys compared to those corn feed brutes you have up there.

    Hey, you could be shooting those little things they have in Lousyanna, they have a bag limit on them there. We have larger wild dogs here than their deer.


    >No instruction sheet, not a problem for
    anyone with an internet connection, but
    a serious error for most beekeepers.

    I installed mine over the weekend. They don't fit in the boxes worth a **** . You need to try them in your box before you get to the yard. I had to add a 1/4 inch to one of my boxes to keep them from pushing up in the box. I could not put the lid on the hive. As a matter of fact, if I didn't have a long hive tool, I would not have been able to get them all squared away in the box. You will need a long thin tool to wedge inbetween the frames to get them packed evenly into the box. The first one was not easy.

    Another idea came to me about bees drawing out on the the plastic. I sprayed each of the packs with a small squirt of 1 to 1 syrup before installing them just for a little insurance.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    near Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    40

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    I hived a big swarm on a medium with foundation as a brood chamber, queen excluder, and the bee-o-pac on top. The bees wouldn't touch the plastic for a while. I added a shallow super with foundation between the excluder and the bee-o-pac because I thought they would need the room. I misted the bee-o-pac with syrup to try and help. It's been 12 days since the swarm was hived and they are now starting to fill out the center sections. I have to admit, they look real pretty with the sun shining down in the hive!
    I too was dissappointed though with how poorly the two pieces of the frame went together. It's almost like you have to insert them in the super to keep the frame halves together. Now I'm wondering if I should even think about trying to move center frames to the outside and the outside in in order to get all the sections filled. I would guess that this would be a difficult task. I might try it to see how it goes though. Anyone else working with these now that they have most likely arrived?
    I like the concept and I think the package presentation is a sure seller, but it still needs some fine tuning on the frame assembly I think.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

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    >I too was dissappointed though with how poorly the two pieces of the frame went together. It's almost like you have to insert them in the super to keep the frame halves together.

    When you put the halves together, did you smash the 'pegs' with plyers to peign the 'rivet' so they would not seperate? I was wondering if you got instructions with your order, I did.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Carnation, WA, USA
    Posts
    120

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    Like Bullseye Bill, I think I'll have to make a 1/4" or 1/2" shim to keep the bottoms of the pacs from bottoming out.

    I didn't get instructions with my order, but here's the instructions given on the Bee-O-Sphere site.

    1. The Bee-O-Pac system consists of eight bee-o-pac frames that fit directly into a standard 6 5/8" honey super. These frames are assembled from two nearly identical frame halves. One half has eight holes die cut on its sides while the other half has round buttons in matching locations.

    2. To assemble the two frame halves: take a frame half with the buttons and lay it on the table with the plugs pointing up. Place the other half with the holes on top of the first half so that the buttons fit through the holes. Push down on the top frame to hold everything in place. With a pair of square nose pliers, crimp the two halves together at each button/hole combination, by crimping the buttons and forming a rivet through each hole. Push up with the bottom plier jaw to make sure the button is completely through the hole before crimping the button. Time: 20 seconds per frame


    3. Place eight assembled frames into the super as with standard frames. The fit is snug. Put 7 frames in the super and then use a piece of corrugated cardboard about 7" by 15" as a sort of shoe horn. With the seven frames in place use the cardboard to cover the spacer buttons on the last frame and also compress the stack of frames slightly. Now you can slip the last frame into position and pull out the cardboard and everything lines up. The tightness of the frames keeps everything straight and aligned.

    4. Place the super on the top of a strong hive. Let the bees build comb.

    5. When the Bee-O-Pac frames are filled and capped use a bee escape between the super you wish to remove and the hive and then remove the super with the filled frames and take back to your honey house.

    6. Back at your honey house remove the Bee-O-Pac frames one at a time from the super. Separate the frame into the two halves by prying apart the rivet points with a hive tool or screwdriver. Lie the two halves on the table, comb side up. Separate the outside portion of one frame half by following the die cuts with a utility knife and cutting the very small "nicks" that still attach everything together. This will leave eight Bee-O-Pacs attached to each other along their edges. Separate the eight "pacs" in the same way with a knife. Do the same for the other frame half. Time: 2 minute per frame approx.

    7. Snap the accompanying lids on each separated container. Time: 1 minute per frame approx.

    8. Attach a wraparound label to each lidded Bee-O-Pac ready for retail sale. Time: 1 minute per frame approx.

    9. The individual Bee-O-Pacs may be stacked on top of each other, in a box for transport to market, using the self-stacking feature. Time: 1 minute per frame approx.

    10. The comb honey must be frozen in the deep freeze to kill any wax moth eggs that may be on the comb otherwise they will hatch and make a mess. We recommend you freeze the comb honey after it has been completely packaged with the lids

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    near Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    40

    Post

    No, I didn't receive any instructions with my order. I did "smash the pegs" which worked ok, but not 100%. Do you think they will hold together with the weight of the honey in them in order to rotate the center frames out or should I just have patience...I guess I just worry too much, most likely the bees will propolize the frames and they will be fine...

  10. #30

    Post

    Have not got the bee o pac yet from better bee will call today need it asap for this year. just from what i am hearing it might not matter.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

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    I don't think I will try to rotate mine. Once they start getting heavy AND sticky they will be even harder to get into place.

  12. #32

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    better bee said It will be here on wed. bout time for this year.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

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    James:

    How do you like the taste of tallow honey? I made a lot of it when I lived in Corpus Christi, but I never really developed a liking for the taste.

    Here in Oklahoma I am all of a sudden getting a vetch crop, my great favorite. Seems that someone got vetch started in his wheat, combined it, had it cleaned for seed and gave a lot of the cleanings to a friend for his meadow. I buy hay from that fellow so now I have vetch too.
    Ox

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

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    Two weeks since I installed them, clover is in full bloom, and the girls havn't touched them yet.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    near Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    40

    Post

    Checked the hive with the bee-o-pac super today and they have progressed outward well. Now they are working earnestly on 5 of the frames and beginning to work on the outer ones.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

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    I had problems with the halves staying together, once jammed into the super things held together - sort of. I hope they propolize them together a bit. I considered adding a couple of staples along the top just to hold things together. We'll see.


  17. #37

    Post

    Got mine today hope to get it on this afternoon.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    722

    Post

    Ordered mine from better bee 6 weeks ago. Was told they were backordered but would be in 2 weeks from then. Still nothing early this week (and no charge showing up on the credit card either). My wife called and was told 'theres a problem I'll have to check with someone', then later was told by the next person that came on the line that there was a problem with shipping and they were 'shipped here rather than there' (Which make no sense to me, and I hardly belive they were ever shipped without being charged), 'but they will go out next week'. Their explanation was confusing, but hopefully they will arrive soon because the credit card was charged the next day.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    7

    Post

    Bee O Sphere

    I have been reading your comments regarding the bee-o-pac and i wish to say the following
    1. the demand for the product was over whelming for us just coming on the market place for the first time.
    2. We also did not put instruction sheets into the cases and that error has been corrected. It maybe too late for some of the early buyers and we have been trying to back track to get the instructions out anyway we can.
    3. When we designed the connection tabs we had to consider many things and the one that really became a concern was at the time of harvest. What I mean by this is that the wax capping will not take a lot of abuse. At the time of harvest it is very important that the frames seperate with ease.
    4. We are starting to get feed back regarding the bee O Pacs and from the sounds of it Harvest maybe very soon for some. My suggestion when it comes to seperating the frames is that you do it while it is still hanging by the tabs in the super if your planning to do the harvest alone. Remove each half and place on a flat surface. If you take the full frame out at once it will require two people.
    5. Ian and I will re-think the connection tabs since it has become such an issue but what we found is that when the tabs are pinched and the bees glue the seam, it become very sturdy
    6.For the beekeepers that are finding that acceptance seems to be slow I will refer to a comment that was made on this site about spraying sugar water on the frames to get the bees attracted to the super. I will agree with this comment as being the best way to get them started faster on filling the packages.
    7. In Europe honey is being sold by floral source instead of color. The bee O Pac is a small package and it will be easy to seperate flora source when it comes to harvest. Ian and I discovered that the bees seperate floral source and it can be seen when you look at the back side of the packages. Something to consider when marketing the Bee O Pacs to the consumer is that you sell a flavor instead of color. Some very strong flavors would be Strawberry, Blueberry, Buckwheat, clover and this list will expand greatly as each geographic region markets their own flora sources.

    I hope that I did not bore everyone with my comments but after four years of testing the product before release we still have a lot to learn. What we did set out to do was to get the bees to fill their own consumer ready container which they will do, reduce the effort for the beekeeper in the production of comb honey, increase the value for comb honey and increase the revenue for the beekeeper and last give the consumer the smaller package they wanted.
    The last statement is hard for many to believe but we drew that conclusion from many market studies that have been done over the years.


    Andrew Sperlich www.beeosphere.com


  20. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Thanks Sperlich for the info, I am glad that the spraying with syrup has worked for someone before. I did that when I installed them about three weeks ago, my girls have yet to start useing them. Any tips on getting the bees working the packs other than the syrup? Perhaps more crowding or less super space?

    Just fyi, I had no problem with smashing the tabs, well I messed up two tabs in two supers, that wasn't bad I thought.

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