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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Jackson, Ga USA
    Posts
    146

    Question

    Has anyone used KILZ as a primer on your hive bodies before painting them?
    I will be using oil based paint and was wondering if I could use Kilz as a primer. My wife will be using stencils to paint decorations on them like vines, bees, other plant pictures. I think this will help the bees to distinguish thier home hive.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    >Has anyone used KILZ as a primer on your hive bodies before painting them?
    I will be using oil based paint and was wondering if I could use Kilz as a primer. My wife will be using stencils to paint decorations on them like vines, bees, other plant pictures. I think this will help the bees to distinguish thier home hive.

    I have not, but I'm sure any kind of paint that is exterior paint and used on the outside will work fine.

    I think the bees will find them anyway, but if you like to decorate it won't hurt the bees feelings any.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    I was under the impression that KILZ was for water base paint,but I don't think that it would hurt anything.When I use oil base paint I don't prime with anything.>>>>Mark

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Kilz is an alkid (oil based) primer that is suitable for both oil and latex based covers.

    Most alkid primers need to be covered with oils (alkids), kilz can be covered with either.

    ------------------
    Scot Mc Pherson
    "Linux is a Journey, not a Guided Tour" ~ Me
    "Do or not do, there is no try" ~ Master Yoda
    BeeSourceFAQ: http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/beewiki/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    Sometimes I don't even paint them. But when I do it's just one coat of exterior paint and no primer.

    It's not the White House.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Jackson, Ga USA
    Posts
    146

    Big Grin

    I agree MB about it not being the White House, however, 'an ounce of prevention...'
    I'm going for longetivity and durability while the wife is following her 'motherly?' inclinations.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    Kilz comes in oil and latex. I have used alot of the latex for blocking stains bleeding thru. It has a mold killing agent in it. I have no idea this would effect the bees.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    First a question: Do you paint the inside of the hive too? Or just the outside?
    I have used Kilz in repainting inside my cottage to kill mold. It works well as a primer to cover up problem spots that bleed through other paint. It would keep sap from seeping through if you are very concerned about looks. But probably cheaper to use something else.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    I just paint the outside.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Eagle Creek, Oregon
    Posts
    289

    Post

    I'm about ready to paint some woodenware and was thinking of stacking it and spraying the whole stack at one time. I would stack supers, inner covers, Imirie shims, top feeders, etc., all in one stack. The problem with this approach is that the pieces will all be stuck together by the paint. Can anybody suggest a simple way to stack the pieces for painting and be able to separate them afterward? I could wax the edges but I don't think that would do it for me. Shims between layers, maybe?
    George

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    I do exactly that with a roller all the time. I just paint them and pry them apart with a hive tool. The paint doesn't stick it together any more than the propolise does.

    If I were doing it "right" I would paint the edges of the boxes too, but I have seldom found the time.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Same as MB. I use a roller and use the hive tool to pry apart. A sprayer should work the same.

    George you paint inner covers????

    How many of you paint your inner covers?

    I think I've painted only maybe 2 inner covers ever. I never thought it was neccesary as they really aren't exposed to the weather. Anyone here ever compare to see if the painting increases the useful life of them? I would consider painting them if it significantly increased there life span.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Pomfret, MD, USA
    Posts
    242

    Post

    I painted my boxes this weekend. I had some Kilz but decided against it and just went with the latex exterior for the following reasons:

    1. Kilz is generally used as a cover for bad water stains which often "bleed" through just plain paint, or as a white coating for a dark color prior to painting on a light color.

    2. Kilz is also generally used as a primer over previous coats of gloss or satin paints. This provides a rough surface that the next layer can adhere to. It works better than just scuffing the wall.

    Plain wood boxes or boxes previously painted with flat type paint don't need it.

    Kai

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Pomfret, MD, USA
    Posts
    242

    Post

    One more thing. I've decided to trash the 5 brand new medium supers that I had coated with copper napthanate. After reading all the health warnings on the back of the container I decided better safe than sorry. It kind of pisses me off that I've wasted about $50.00, but I agree with M.B. - these are basically food containers and I'm not going to have the bees crawling all over them.

    It seems crazy to me that this stuff is recommended in numerous bee books. I myself got the recommendation from a video by Dr. Keith Delaplane. I wonder if anyone has ever tested wax and honey for residues of this stuff in them.

    Even the paint kind of gives me pause, but at least it's just on the outside of the boxes.

    Kai

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    Why not use the napthelate coated ones as a hive stand. Just set them on the ground and put your hive on top of that. If you have a SBB the debris will fall through to this area and there will be some ventilation with no draft. It could also put your entrance up where the mice can't easily get in. You could also use them for extra boxes on top when putting on feeders ect. since the bees won't be living in them. Or use them for a vent box by drilling some holes in the side, covering with #8 hardware cloth and cover the hole in the inner cover with #8 hardware cloth.

    I can think of a lot of uses for them. But the hive stand is the most appealing since they are "treated" lumber.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Pomfret, MD, USA
    Posts
    242

    Post

    Those are good ideas. I think using them as covers for hive top feeders will work for me. Using them as stands might work well, too.

    Thanks, MB. Helpful as usual.


    Kai

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I can think of about a dozen uses for them too. However, if you need brood/supers, just paint them inside and out and use them. Once they are sealed up with paint, I believe that your concerns are 'covered'.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    Maybe we finally found a use for Kilz on bee boxes. Put a layer of Kilz on and it probably will keep the stuff from bleeding through.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Pomfret, MD, USA
    Posts
    242

    Post

    I thought of that too, but was worried about the latex being on the inside.

    However, I just did some research on this. Apparently, latex paint is considered by the EPA to be of low toxicity unless consumed in large amounts. There are some exterior latex paints which must be labled "For exterior use only" because they contain mercury as a pesticide. I don't think the Kilz I have falls in that category. I'll check when I get home.

    So I guess painting the inside of the boxes with latex Kilz will solve my problem. Hopefully it won't bug the bees. No pun intended.


    Thanks,
    Kai

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Eagle Creek, Oregon
    Posts
    289

    Post

    >George you paint inner covers????

    >How many of you paint your inner covers?

    Clayton,
    this is all new equipment and has not been treated in any way, so far. I will be stacking the equipment and painting it all at once so it would be no more trouble to include the inner covers than it would be to omit them from the stack. Only the outside face of any stackable piece will be painted. Is there a reason not to paint the outside of an inner cover?
    Thanks
    George

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