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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Bridgewater VT. USA
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    238

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    Does anyone or has anyone tried using cedar to build hive boxes. Does cedar bother the bees? would it help with mite control? any feedback or info would be apreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,136

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    I have not made any cedar hives, but have seen a lot of cedar migratory covers and have had cypress hive bodies and have heard of people making them out of cedar. As far as I know it works ok, it's just expensive. It's also nice and light weight. I've also heard of wild hives in cedar trees, though not often because they aren't often hollow.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,136

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    My guess is the mites won't care, but it might cut down on wax moths.

    We can always hope anyway.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
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    2,837

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    I have seen some catalogs w/ items made from western cedar. Red cedar from which a "cedar chest" is made, might be too aromatic. But, a hive stand, thats in contact with the ground might never rot, if made from red cedar. Red cedar is very common in the SE US and is often considered an undesirable "lumber" tree. They do not grow very large and the demand for the wood is low. Might be a good choice for hive stands

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

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    The state of MS.built duck nest out of cedar & I've seen alot of bee's build in them.>>>>Mark

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Bridgewater VT. USA
    Posts
    238

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    Thanks guys I guess I will have to try cedar for a while and see if the bees will take to it. I will post the results this summer.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

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    Hi,

    You can use eastern white cedar. I personally would avoid the red cedar as it is quite aromatic and the bees may not care for it. I doubt it will do much against mites, and even if it does it will probably effect the bees in the same way too. The white cedar is good, light too, but may be hard to find big enough to make boxes from. But it should work well enough for frames and things.

    Clay

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
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    2,837

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    Clayton is right, white cedar would also be a very good choice.

    White cedar was (still) once used often in construction of canoes, because it is very light-weight, very rot-resistant.

    But white cedar does not "machine" well (frames require a lot), wont withstand much abuse (prying apart), is expensive, and in my local, very, very to find.

    I think the all-round "BEST" answer, is White Pine.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mn, wi, tx
    Posts
    174

    Post

    my experience with cedar is that it tends to split very easily as you drive nails.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

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    The red cedars here in TN are wanted for anything to be placed outdoor and for fence post. The problem is finding a large enough tree with no limbs. The cedars that have grown close together have few limbs and the price is to high to be used for hive because it is wanted to make furniture. It nails easy with little or no splitting even when well seasoned. Cypress would be the wood of choice for me if money was not the main issue.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

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    During my logging years I fell many Incense Cedars over 6 foot diameter.In the West this is the cedar used for fencing.It used to be cheap and I used lots of it for hives.Over the years I took more bees out of Incense cedars than any other tree because the great big ones often had rot and hollow spots that swarms had moved into.It will split much easier than pine but I staple everything so its no problem.We have small aromatic Juniper trees here that some people call cedar,but its not much good for lumber because it twists and warps.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

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    I had two calls last year to remove colonys that were both in cedar squirl nest boxes.

    As far as being aromatic, that doesn't matter as soon as the bees propolize the interior.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

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    Bees will propolize anything they find offensive such as menthol or formic pads.They never propolized the incense cedar boxes any more than pine so obviously they have no problem with the smell.I can assure you there is absolutely no effect on mites.The bees will die just as quick in cedar boxes.(by the way bees working on mint fields get no protection from mites by way of 'essential oils' either.I saw a yard of 60 hives die from varroa while working hundreds of acres of peppermint)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Foley, AL
    Posts
    1
    I have many supers made from red cedar. The bees seem to like them just fine. I wondered about using them too, they were made by a friend of a relative in Indiana and given to me.

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