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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    hartley,texas,USA
    Posts
    65

    Post

    This Saturday I am going to buy a narrow crown air stapler for assembling frames.I was looking at the Porter-Cable stapler at Home Depot they have 2 different ones the one that uses up to 1" staples that is $88 and one that uses up to 1.5" for something like $125. My question is are the 1" staples long enough for the frames or should I spend the extra money for the 1.5" gun. Walter T Kelley sells a gun that goes up to 1.5" but they say to use 1" staples for frames.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    Joens:The way I was taught was to use a stapel that was twice the length as the wood is thick.
    I have been using 3/4" for years & have not any problems.>>>>Mark

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    I don't staple, but would shoot for 1 1/4" staples if possible. If you glue too you can go with the shorter if you don't maybe go with the longer. But thats me!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    hartley,texas,USA
    Posts
    65

    Post

    I always glue everything as well.I want everything to hold together.

    [This message has been edited by joens (edited January 01, 2004).]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    My stapler was made for laying carpet. So mine is the narrow(1/4") rounded head upto 1 1/2" long. The staples I have are 1 1/4". They work great.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    It is all the fault of this board. I was a carpenter for years and never had a gun, but I got so tired of bending those little nails on frames, that I bought a gun from Walter T. Kelly. They recommended 1" for frames and they seem to work fine. But some of it depends on how brittle the wood is and how straight you can shoot. If you can get them in straight without splitting the wood, the longer ones will hold more.

    Also, I just bought a table saw. I've always just cut things out with a skill saw. I never owned a table saw before, but I find myself making top bars and frames etc. and it is SO much easier with a table saw. $88 at home depot.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Also, I just bought a table saw. I've always just cut things out with a skill saw. I never owned a table saw before, but I find myself making top bars and frames etc. and it is SO much easier with a table saw. $88 at home depot.

    Congratulations! A good tablesaw will set you free, just like getting that first word processor. What you can now do and the quality/quanity of your work will multiply many times over.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    Tip: Soak tips of end bars for 15 minutes in warm water before nailing to prevent splitting.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Sebastopol, CA, USA
    Posts
    29

    Post

    I use 1&1/4" Senco staples for frames. Staples are much less likely than nails to split frames because they have blunt points and glue on them to hold better.(The old carpenter trick is to blunt your nail when you are worried about splitting wood. That way the nail tears into the wood instead of forcing the fibers apart and causing the wood to split.) I still nail boxes with hot dipped galvenized nails, but always blunt the top nail on the end of the boxes to keep from splitting the wood.

    Happy nailing!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Big Grin

    MrBEE

    Just so you DONT blame this board I would like to offer YOU some advice!

    Please be careful w/ new table saw, your fingers are need here!

    A skill saw usually runs across your upper thigh, but you can still type!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    I will try to remain as diligent with the table saw as I have been these years with the skill saw.

    BTW I've been using table saws all my life, I just never owned one. My father did when I was growing up, I used one in shop class in High School, I used one working with a cabinet maker as a carpenter.

    That cabnet maker has been doing cabinets and carpentry for 50 years and never cut himself on a saw, when he ran his thumb through. He had the blade set so it barely stuck through the wood or he would have lost his thumb. It reminds you that no matter how long you've been doing it, it only takes a second of not thinking.


    [This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited January 02, 2004).]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    469

    Post

    Joens, Go with the 1.5 gun.You will find yourself using for a lot more than frames.I use mine to assemble many hive parts.

    Jack

  13. #13

    Wink

    I use an old narrow crown senco stapler with 1" staples. Never had any problems. If I were you I would buy the one that can shoot longer staples just so it would be more versitile in the future. I am sure you will find something in the future where you will want longer staples.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Post

    stapling and glueing gives you a much stronger joint than either alone. the staple helps set a very thin glue joint - too much glue weakens the joint.

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