Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    I have found that I can make my own hive boxes and other equipment using rough cut pine lumber from local mills for very little cost. A medium super cost $1.95 and a deep @ $2.05, including screws and glue.
    Another additional cost savings can come through buying the waste slab wood from the mill and culling what you can use from it.
    The rest and waste goes into the wood furnance to heat the house.
    Locally - Deliveried:
    1" x 8" x 8' @$2.56
    1" x 10" x 8'@$3.20
    Slab wood @ $25.00 per load delivered about 1 1/4 cords.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,221

    Post

    Don't forget your time spent. Your time is worth something

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    I agree that I have not included time spent as a cost. The time it takes to cut the lengths and butt joint the boxes is not long, but there is time taken.
    But I look at it like this, I don't do carpentry or wood working for a living, so this time spent is relaxing and a diversion from my work.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,945

    Post

    Also add in the cost of your saws, blades, electricity, rent on your shop space, and the cost of a divorce settlement when your wife dumps you becuase you are spending all of your time on your beekeeping hobby.

    Beekeeping is the ideal hobby when your marraige is in trouble. You can spend every nite in the garage making equipment, and weekends playing with the bees. You never have to talk to the old bag, and she surely won't want to help you sawing and getting the crap stung out of you. Your beekeeping buddys will keep you company and don't mind when their gargage is all sticky due to it's becoming extracting room central. It was back in the seventies for me, I remember it well.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Wayne, NJ USA
    Posts
    381

    Post

    odfrank,

    Thanks, that was great. Your comments are right on the money. I've got to go dry my eyes from laughing so hard. cj

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Eubank, Kentucky
    Posts
    34

    Post

    Do you have any problems with warping or splitting as the wood dries? I go to construction sites and get the scrap 3/4 pine boards that are used on the roof. This helps keep the cost down.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    I buy an assortment of boards so that I have them around for projects and jobs. I let the boards dry before using them, if need be. Sometimes the boards have already been dried. I just got an order deliveried and will not start using it till later in the winter. But, as long as they have dried a bit, I don't have problems with splitting.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Well if you want to save $$$ time usually sufferes. If you got lots of $$$ you can save time. No matter what you do in beekeeping there is some time investment (I hope). You only run into problem here when you have to spend and pay someone else to do it too

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    97

    Post

    I Just spent a couple hours today turning recycled 1x's and plywood into outer tops. Naturally it took longer because it was previously used and nails ect, had to be pulled out, but still about two hours start to finish. I managed to cut the wood (using the plans on Beesource) for 10 covers, and asembled seven of them minus plywood on top. I have access to all of the needed equipment for free, so this is very cost efficient for me!

    Anyways,

    what would you guys / women recommend for a dado blade?

    What do you guys use for the metal on the covers?

    Thanks!

    [This message has been edited by Brandon Shaw (edited November 30, 2003).]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    for dado blades I use a carbide tiped from craftsman (stacked type).
    for the top covers I usually use migratory but I also have tin tops on the experimental hives that I overwinter here and I go to a print shop and purchase used print plates that are aluminum and bend my own. not the best looking but the price is low. $0.50 each.
    Clint


    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    If you go to your local Roofing or siding supplier you can purchase something called "coil". It is a roll of aluminum painted on both sides. You can get white,and one step is saved. (painting) Especially if you cover all visible wood. It staples well. You will need to buy a full roll. I think that's 50 ft. Open the box carefully and you can unroll what you need that day. Makes a lot of covers. I also put a piece on the inside of the cover where the condensation occurs and tilt them enough to let the droplets run away from the cluster. I'm working on how to use it for pull out bottom boards.

    Dick Marron

    [This message has been edited by dickm (edited December 01, 2003).]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    97

    Post

    Ok dickm, here's a questino for you, or anyone that can tell me...

    I finally bought the coil yesterday. I looked at four different stores and ended up buying the unpainted aluminum coil 20"x50' roll for $ 30.00. I came accross the painted type on an internet site, but the price was close to double!

    Anyways, how do you bend it to look nice? The first piece I stapled was a disaster it looked worse than anything that ever came out of my junior high shop class. It would have served th purpose very well, but I want it to look better and not cut off a finger when moving them.

    I ended up gluing the metal down with a polyurethane glue. Hopefully this works. I hope by gluing it down I can take a roller and bend the edges over to be able to staple. Any tips?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    The best way I know, is to fold/crease by hand as best you can, then very gently, tap the crease w/ a hammer to "sharpen" the bend. I used 3/8" alum tacks (about 2 ea side) to secure to the wood. After removing the "factory" oily coating w/ mineral sprits, I primed, then painted (lite green)the alum to match hive. An easy way to cut very thin alum, is to use a steel straight edge, and score (don't cut through) the alum using a SHARP utility knife. Then bend and break apart. Make a nice edge.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    I have not made an outer cover but have done some siding work. You can make a break out of 3 hardwood 2x4s(pine gives to much). You make a set of saw horses and screw one 2x4 to the horses at one end on the very edge. The boards that goes on bottom has to have a thin style hinge inset so that the board surface is flat. You can drill thru the top board and into the bottom one and insert a dowel or steel rod so you do not have to cener it each time. You then use C clamps to hold the boards together tight with the metal in between with your mark at the edge of your 2x. You then pull up on the bottom board that is attached by the hinges. We used a break and one of these home made breaks to get the job done alot faster. The real break was mostly used for door and window trim and the home made one used for the soffit. Since you are using short area of metal and not doing any real short breaks it should work great.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads