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Thread: feeders

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Mapleton, ME
    Posts
    28

    Post

    I have 20 hives that I now feed with entrance feeders. It is a huge pain. I plan on feeding them in the fall and would like a better way. If I could afford it I would order the $20 hive top feeder, but I really would like to get away with a cheaper option. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    http://www.beeworks.com/uspage5.asp listed as "Rapid Feeder". This is my favorite feeder. You just add a box on top with the feeder over the inner cover. You can fill the feeder without ever facing a bee. You don't have to suit up, you don't have to light a smoker. Just pull the cover and fill it up. They are $9.30 each. A less convenient but cheaper feeder is the baggie feeder. http://www.beesource.com/eob/baggie.htm

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    deggary,
    I found this on another forum and plan on trying it. I've been in contact with Lee and I'm pretty sure he wouldn't mind me sharing this with this forum.

    "I’m always looking for reliable ways to save money on equipment and supplies. Here’s a trick that will save you the cost of a top feeder. If you’ve received a package of bees anytime recently, DON’T THROW THE WOODEN SHIPPING BOX AWAY. Instead, remove the wire screen from one side and cover the hole where the sugar syrup can was inserted, with wood or some of the screen you just removed. You now have a box, when turned over on its side with the remaining screened side facing up, that will nicely cover the hole in an inner cover and also cover a shallow pan to hold the syrup being fed. For a pan, I like the 2 pound ground chuck trays from the grocery section of Wally World. These trays are stamped on the bottom “top-rack dishwasher safe and microwavable.” They hold a little over a quart of syrup. The only other things required are strips of plastic or wood that will float to keep the bees from drowning. I cut strips from an extra tray because I like plastic over wood. Wood is porous and a great breeding ground for bacteria. When I’m through feeding, I put the tray and strips through the dishwasher.
    The box itself offers another advantage. When using pail feeders, an empty deep super is required. But when turned on its side, a shipping box fits nicely inside an empty shallow super. When my newly hived swarms, packages, or hives need feeding, I just remove the top cover and pour the syrup right through the screen into the pan. The screened top keeps the bees out of my face and I don’t end up messing around with front entrance feeders. Besides at NO COST, these homemade Miller feeders are much more economical than the factory made versions. Enjoy…… "
    Lee


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    denise: what other forum? I like to read>>>>>>Mark

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I bought the hive top feeders from Mid-con for $11 or $14 each. They are the good ones with the screen on top to keep the bees from flying out and screen footing so they don't drown as many bees.
    Bill

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    Mark,
    There is a bees/beekeeping forum at GardenWeb.com
    Not as active as this one but I've been a member for a few years and have made some good friends there.
    Denise

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    medesto,indiana,usa
    Posts
    257

    Post

    At the dollar store here they have square aluminum roasting tins that will fit in a super that could be used as a feeder.

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