Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: HFCS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    jackson county, indiana
    Posts
    27

    Post

    I am going to start feeding type 42 hfcs. it is 70% sugar 30% water. Can anyone tell me how much water to add to five gallons to get a 2:1 sugar to water ratio. How about a 1:1.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,729

    Post

    >I am going to start feeding type 42 hfcs. it is 70% sugar 30% water. Can anyone tell me how much water to add to five gallons to get a 2:1 sugar to water ratio. How about a 1:1.

    It's probably not that critical to get it perfect. The bees will gobble it down at any strength that is close to as sweet as nectar or more sweet.

    The High Fructoce Corn Syrup is not going to have the same effect for spring stimulation as the 2:1 sucrose sugar will. The production of the enzymes to change the sucrose makes the bees think it's a nectar flow, and the HFCS has already has that change done to it.

    2:1 and 1:1 syrup are by volume. In other words, you take a quart of hot water and a quart of sugar and you get 1:1 syrup. I'm assuming the 70% sugar 30% water are by weight? If you knew that for sure you could weigh a quart of sugar. A quart of water weighs two pounds. And you could figure out the ratio by weight then. I'm really not sure if the 70/30 ratio is by weight, or volume or what. You need to have them both in the same terms to figure it out, and I'm not sure what the terms are.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    jackson county, indiana
    Posts
    27

    Post

    I would imagine it is by volume. My refractometer that I use for honey shows 30% and that would be actual percent of water in solution would it not?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,729

    Post

    I guess I've never paid that much attention to what a refractometer measures, but I'm guessing that 30% is by weight. Measuring by volume is more of a convenience for recipes.

    Then to find the answer requires that we find the weight of a quart of sugar and make a ratio with the weight of a quart of water (2 pounds) to calcuate the answer of how much water to add. I don't have a scale to weigh anything that small, but you could start with a new 5 pound bag and see how many quarts of sugar there are in a 5 pound bag to figure it out.

    I don't have an unopened one right now.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads