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Thread: What wood

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Aegina, Greece
    Posts
    28

    Cool

    As a beginner i have the following questions
    a) Is possible to build the hive with good quallity plywood?
    b) I can't find so wide wood pieces to build. Can i glue 2 pieces and use it as one?
    Sorry for my bad use of English language.
    Happy new year to everybody.

    [This message has been edited by mikeaegina (edited December 29, 2002).]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    >a) Is possible to build the hive with good quallity plywood?
    Yes. The reason commercial hives are not made of plywood is that buying new plywood is more expensive than plain wood. I have made them from scrap plywood with good success. If you can find someone decking a floor with 3/4" tongue and groove plywood, there are usually big enough scraps to make Lanstroth hives, and lids. Even as small as 5/8" can work, but not as well.

    >b) I can't find so wide wood pieces to build. Can i glue 2 pieces and use it as one?
    The important thing on a Lanstroth movable frame hive is the dimensions. As long as the inside dimensions are correct it will work. The outside dimensions are only important for a telescopic cover to fit over the top box. If you just use scrap plywood and make a flat lid with some weights or a migratory cover they are less important. I say all of this, because to use smaller peices you have to have some way to attach them. I would use some kind of outside corner. If you have a 2 x 2 scrap for each corner you can, at each corner, run one side on the inside of the 2 x 2 flush with the outside edge of it and the other side of the hive on the outside of the 2 x 2 and have a strong corner with as many different widths as necessary to make the width of the hive. I have not had trouble here (USA) finding scraps large enough to do in one width. The most common scraps around here are chip board (comes in several brand names, Blandex, Ox Board etc.). These are usually between 5/16" and 7/16" thick and often 1/2" thick. They come in as large as 24" x 48". Any larger and they usually don't throw them away. But there are lots of them that are 9 5/8" or more wide.

    Basically you can build a hive out of anything that is not toxic to the bees. The only important thing for a movable comb hive is consistent size inside.

    >Sorry for my bad use of English language.
    Not bad English at all. I had no trouble understanding the question.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    Out of curiosity are langstroth hive bodies used in Greece? If not what type?

    Also what about using a biscuit joiner to put two piece of wood together to get the size needed?

    Clay


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Aegina, Greece
    Posts
    28

    Post

    Thank you very much for answering my questions.

    Yes, that's almost the only kind of hives we use here but with a small difference. Both floors have the same dimension.


    [This message has been edited by mikeaegina (edited December 30, 2002).]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Richmond, VA USA
    Posts
    34

    Post

    Regarding the use of a biscuit jointer to join two pieces of wood: it is my understanding that the biscuits don't add much strength but merely serve to aid in alignment. As long as a Type II outdoor glue is used to join the two boards (and the two boards mate well along the edges), I would think gluing up boards is an inexpensive but timeconsuming way to create wide boards. I wouldn't use plywood for hive bodies for two reasons: delamination of the plys and weight.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    I don't think it is practical to use new plywood to build hives, other than using the really thin exterior glue laun for some things like inner covers, lids etc. But free scrap plywood (with exterior glue) is hard to beat. I have built a lot of hives out of floor decking and and had no more problem with delamination than I have with any other hive eventually wearing out and falling apart. This is assuming you paint it etc. Can't beat the price of free if you've got the time to build them.

  7. #7

    Post

    We hardly ever use biscuits in our woodworking shop. Doors, drawers, etc., just get glued and then pipe-clamped. In fact, my Dadant bottom board that I ordered a couple weeks ago seemed to just be glued together.

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