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Thread: Digital Camera

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    9,384

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    Since there are several of us planning to buy digital cameras soon, can I get you all to share with us what brand and model you are buying and what are some of the features that make it the right one for you? I plan to buy one this winter so any discussion would be helpful.

    Regards,
    Barry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,810

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    I got a Canon Powershot S330 Elph. Here's my crieria:

    I figure if I want the maximum resolution I'll take a photo. To post things on web sites or send photos to friends there's not a lot of point in a picture that is more than 1024 x 728. About the only reason for higher resolution is so you can crop it or zoom in on it more. The s330 Elph is 2.1 megapixels. You can get higher but you'd have a picture that would require scrolling all over to see it and would take forever to upload or download. 2.1 is higher than I need, so I operate it at less most of the time. You can buy a 640 x 480 resolution camera for about $30 or so and they aren't bad, but although the resolution should be acceptable the other aspects of quality don't seem to be up to snuff. Part of my consideration was also size. The Elph is a small camera and I thought would be handy. I've had some Canon's in the past and had good luck with them. I don't like that it takes a proprietary battery.

    Pros:
    Small size.
    o Better than good enough resolution.
    o A lot of manual control if you want it.
    o A lot of automatic features if you want them.
    o It allows continous shooting, which I wanted for catching the grandkids at that magic moment and for catching my horses in that magic moment. I shoot a bunch of pictures and delete most of them, but it cathces those magic smiles or motion.
    o Takes standard CompactFlash card.
    o Has a zoom lens. This is nice when you want to frame the picture nicely without running up and back to get the size correct.
    o Has a closeup setting.

    Cons:
    o Proprietary battery. Can't just buy one from anyone anywhere.
    o Came with a 8mb CompactFlash card. Not big enough. I bought a 512mb one seperately.
    o Didn't come with a case. I bought one seperately.
    o Many manual features. This is a pro and a con. You can control so many things. When I was first messing with it there was a three second lag between when I pressed the shutter button and the picture was taken. It took some settings and some changes in my procedure to shorten this. One thing is to partially press the button to lock the focus and the exposure and then wait for the baby to smile.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

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    I have a Kodak dx3600, that my wife got me for Christmas last year. It is 2.2 megapixels. As for resolution and such, I have no clue. All I know is that it works very well, and the picture, if printed on photo paper look very good. I was really impressed. Being a business equipment tech, I would have to say it is a middle of the road camera, but could be wrong. All I know, is it serves the purpose very well.

    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    804

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    Hello Everyone,

    My brother has been involved with digital photography for some time. I had a chance to visit with him last month and he showed me his Nikon. We went out a took some macro shots of wild bees on the mums. The field of view was less than an inch square and the resulting photos were spectacular.

    So I went shopping for a digital camera. A 2 megapixel camera was sufficient for my needs as I seldom print anything larger than a standard size print. The Nikons were great and the Kodak D4000 was also a good choice for me.

    It seems that the Nikons are exceptional for their macro feature. Almost all the other cameras had a field of view of 4 inches by 6 inches or so.

    The Nikons are selling at about $400, use a proprietary battery and a smartcard rather than the compact flash card.

    So I ended up buying a $200 Canon Powershot A40. It uses standard batteries and the compact flash card. Lots of manual settings and all the automatic stuff. At half the price it is a great buy even though its macro feature doesn't compare with the Nikons. For a review see:
    http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/a40-review/

    This is also a great place to look at other camera reviews as well.

    Best Wishes
    Dennis
    Thinking staulking the wild bee with my macro lens is like hunting on the Serengety...well sort of :> )


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    knoxville tn usa
    Posts
    34

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    I have a degree in photography and if it was me i would buy a nikon 880 or 885 coolpix. the camera has a very senitive ccd and will enable you to view the lcd in very low light conditions. The camera can see better than your eye and has a very reliable focusing system. You can buy another camera for 200 and it will get the job done or spend another two hundred and have a camera that you will love and will last a lifetime.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    804

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    Hello Everyone,

    Another spec to watchout for is the type of software available for the camera if the computer will be used with the camera. Some don't support the Apple OS.

    Unlike most 35mm SLRs some of the digital cameras are not repairable if damaged. My brother had that experience with one of his Nikons. I do wonder how rugged the digitals are?

    Best Wishes
    Dennis

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,384

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    ckinser wrote:
    > and have a camera that you will love and will last a lifetime.

    I have to chuckle as "a lifetime" just doesn't apply to electronics anymore. Now, "lifetime" is measured in one or two years, not 20 to 30 years. The camera may hold up for 20 to 30 years, but the support technology will be outdated in just one or two years. Besides, the cost of repair on most electronics is more than the cost of the product new. This is one reason I never buy top of the line electronics and expect it to only last me a few years. By then, technology will have changed significantly to justify buying current again.

    Regards,
    Barry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

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    I have to chuckle as "a lifetime" just doesn't apply to electronics anymore. Now, "lifetime" is measured in one or two years, not 20 to 30 years. The camera may hold up for 20 to 30 years, but the support technology will be outdated in just one or two years. Besides, the cost of repair on most electronics is more than the cost of the product new. This is one reason I never buy top of the line electronics and expect it to only last me a few years. By then, technology will have changed significantly to justify buying current again.

    Thats for sure. I've been in the electronics field for 15 years, and it is really hard to keep up with the changes. When I started, computers were 8088 4.77 Mhz,
    and if you had money, a 20 meg hard drive. I still remember saying, 20 megs, you'll never fill it! Now, there is 5x on board with a cheap computer. Most programs are more than 20 meg to load! In electronics, what is new today, will be outdated in 3 months.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

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    Well, I finally bit the bullet and bought the camera. Ended up buying a Fujifilm Finepix 2800. Chose this one because of previous experience with an old Fuji 35 mm in the 70's and because it has a really good zoom for the price range of the camera. Now, if I can just figure out how to submit photos of the top bar hives...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    804

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    Hello Dragonfly,

    Just looked at the review for the Fuji. It's a great camera. Looks like there are lots of great buys in the 2.1 meg pixel cameras. A little over a year ago they were almost $400. Now $250 will buy a good one.

    No excuses now for not sharing those tbh secrets.

    Best Wishes
    Dennis

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,384

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    > Now, if I can just figure out how to
    > submit photos of the top bar hives...

    You will have to arrange that with me.
    barry@birkey.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Catonsville, MD. USA
    Posts
    251

    Cool

    epinions.com has excellent reviews and price comparisons. I was looking to buy top of the line and but decided to hold off due to current design problems. In a couple months, hopefully the manufacturers will have worked some of the major issues out with the next model.

  13. #13

    Post

    Hello all. I have had several varieties and brands of digital cameras.

    Olympus Camedia D-340R
    1.3megapixel

    This was our first digital camera. It lasted us two years and proved to be a very good camera. I have taken many photographs with it and enjoyed using it but eventually it wore out from all of the use.

    The next Camera that we owned was:
    FujiFilm FinePix 2600Z
    2.0 megapixels

    I liked this camera because of its compact size. Unfourtanetly I had to return it once to the store because of a problem with the lens cover. Then after only about a year of use the lens stuck out and I decieded to try another brand.

    The last camera we bought
    Samsung Digimax 350S
    3.2megapixels

    This is by far my favorite camera. It was purchased from our local Target store and has proved to work very well for us. It takes movie clips with sounds and has alot of other features. I would recommend this camera to anyone. In fact I did my aunt bought one for my uncle recently.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Milford, NJ, USA
    Posts
    73

    Post

    Barry,
    May be you got it by now, but I have a Sony dsp71. It's fantastic! Very small, extremely "friendly" menu, very powerful, with lots of options raging from B&W, sepia, color or more setttings, focus sharpness settings, different resoutions, e-mail setting (copies a small file for sending by email so you don't loose any friends waiting to get your pictures, nor you have to reduce the size of your pictures prior to sending them), etc.
    However I do not know how most other cameras are...
    Good luck,
    Alex

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