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Thread: nails

  1. #1

    Post

    I am in the process of building ten new hives. this is the first time I have done it from scratch with out a kit. I bought all the lumber and have the bodies put together, Can someone give me the exact size and type of nails I need for the frames? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,396

    Post

    An 1-1/4", 17 or 18 gauge nail is recommened for both top and bottom bar assembly. If you can get them cement coated, all the better.

    I haven't been able to find them locally in bulk so I order them from Dadant.

    -Barry

  3. #3

    Post

    Thanks for the help. I have saved about $200 on building ten hives.
    Phillip

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rainesridgefarm:
    Thanks for the help. I have saved about $200 on building ten hives.
    Phillip
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    i hope you have rabbited the corners on your hives or your savings arent justified i cannot buy lumber as cheap as i can buy hives ready for assembly from western or even dadants, joel johnson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Cortez, Colorado. USA
    Posts
    5

    Smile

    I use decking screws and an electric drill to build 98% of my bee equipment. Works great. I also built my honey house this way too.

    ------------------
    BobBee

  6. #6

    Big Grin

    I have drilled and used deck screws on them and they turned out great. I built a total of ten new hives two bodies deep with tops and bottoms for a grand total of $32 each including frames and foundation. It took two days for everything.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Wink

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rainesridgefarm:
    I have drilled and used deck screws on them and they turned out great. I built a total of ten new hives two bodies deep with tops and bottoms for a grand total of $32 each including frames and foundation. It took two days for everything. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    wow thats $3.20 per hive where do you buy your lumber, you should be in the wooden ware bussiness, with the cost of a complete hive around $50.00 you can make a wonderful profit, isnt it fun to dream?

  8. #8

    Smile

    It said $32 EACH not for all TEN.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Selma Indiana
    Posts
    20

    Smile

    An air compressor crown stapler works great for nailing frames together if you glue the frames first and let it set a few hours there is minimal wood splitting.I use 1/4" x 1" staples.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    lake city, florida, usa
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Cide,
    bee very careful using 1" staples, even with glue. I did this using hot glue over the 1: staples shot with my air nailer and the weight of the honey caused some of the frams to self destruct! The bees were smart enough to make the best of my mistake and it worked out all right but from now on, I will use the 1-1/4 staples!

  11. #11

    Post

    hello all
    I know you all like to save money=got one up on you here.
    I own a woodmizer saw mill and cut and finish all my own hives for pennys per hive I try to find another fellow beekeeper to help me saw the wood thats giveing away for free =dry it plane it cut it into bee hives the cost is pennys .
    wish someone was close to me to help and share the free wood.
    Don

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    Has anybody condidered using 3/4 in exterior plywood? I see it costs about 15 bucks a sheet. I think you could get 5 deeps out of one, but have not done the actual figuring yet. I recently put 3 together from scrap, sealed them up, and made frames to go along with it. If I get a few seasons out of them, maybe it is worth its while.

    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    I have made them out of scrap 3/4" plywood. If you have to buy it, I think the solid wood is cheaper and lasts longer. I usually buy long pieces of #3 pine and work around the knots. 3/4" ply is cheaper than #1 pine for sure. The plywood did ok. It was certainly worth doing since I got the plywood for free. Scap 3/4" ply also makes nice lids. You can just throw a piece on that overhangs a little on all sides and throw some bricks or a block on top and you have a lid. I especially liked sink cutouts that had formica on partical board for lids. The formica lasts almost forever.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    Acutally this is a subject that hasn't come up a lot. How to build hives from scraps. Any building site has a lot of scrap lumber that can be used creatively to build hives, bottom boards, and covers. If you have a table saw and are handy, maybe even frames. Almost all of the scraps at a building site are large enough to be useful in a hive. Plywood for bottom, tops, and boxes. Two bys for stands and the frame around the bottom boards. One bys for almost anything. Tar paper for covering tops. etc.

  15. #15

    Post

    I have been using used wood from construction sites also. I brought a jar of honey to a forman at one site and he calls me when there is good wood for the taking.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Spencer Ia 51
    Posts
    39

    Post

    I enjoy your comments on building hives I wanting to build a few supers this winter. What kind of corners are you constructing? I want to build the rabbet corner but need a jig and dado blade. Thanks Darrell

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    I'm lazy. I just do a butt joint with exterior wood glue and deck screw it together. They last about as well as the rabbets. If you do a butt joint and nail it, it won't last. I don't have a table saw, and it's too much work to do more rabbets than necessary, so I just cut them out with a skill saw. I cut the rabbet for the frame rest with the skill saw.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    I have made them with rabbet joints, and box joints, you know, the ones they call dovetailed joints. Anyway, I have a table saw with a dado set, and I made a box joint jig. The joints are perfect every time, but it requires more time to make the boxes. However, time and strength of the joint is a trade off that I choose. This is one of the reasons I was trying scrap 3/4 plywood. The joints are very strong, and easy to get the right dimensions from.

    If you have a table saw, get the dado set, it is well worth the cash, because you will constantly be using them. I build my nuc boxes with rabbet joints, because the never get as heavy as a deep brood box will.

    Also, I make my own frames, and frame ends made from a 2x8 dadoed at both ends, and along the flat sides, then cut into 3x8 strips seem to be working out very well. I make 10 frames at a time. That way it does not seem so repititious&lt;sp&gt;. I made 7 deeps, 6 are ready to go with foundation already, and its only november!


    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Spencer Ia 51
    Posts
    39

    Post

    Thanks, I need to get a dado and find a jig to use to make the rabbet joint. What jig do you use? Darrell

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    A rabbet joint is really a notch cut the width of the board you are going to butt into it. The rabbet joints that brushy mountain uses are made with a shaper from looking at the picture in the catalog. Box joints are probably stronger than their rabbet joint though. The box joint jig is simple. I can take a picture of it and send it to you via email if you want. It is easy to make, and does a wonderful job. Either way, it is easier to do with a dado set.


    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

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